Benjamin Winnick

Research Interests

  • Social Network Analysis
  • Greek Ethnicity and Regional Identities
  • Greek Mythic Genealogies

Projects

Doctoral Dissertation (Ongoing): The Applications of Social Network Analysis to the Study of Greek Mythic Genealogies
MA Thesis: Mythic Claims to Territory in the Megarid (2015)
Undergraduate Thesis: Arcadia’s Sense of Identity Throughout Antiquity (2012)

Benjamin Winnick is a PhD student in Classics in the UBC CNERS department. His dissertation explores the applications of social network analysis (SNA) to the study of Greek mythic genealogies and regional identities. He holds an MA in Classics with an emphasis in philology from the University of Arizona (2015) and a BA in Classical Studies from the University of Pennsylvania (2012). He has worked as a graduate teaching assistant at the University of Arizona and the University of British Columbia as well as a research assistant in the Archaeological Mapping Labs of the University of Arizona and the University of Pennsylvania. He has participated in archaeological surveys at Burgaz (2011) and Mt. Lykaion (2009). He has also published a translation and commentary on the Flower of Battle: MS Latin 11269, worked as a translator for the UBC History Department, and taught Latin as a full-time middle and high school teacher.

Awards

2018 Best Graduate Student Paper Finalist, Classical Association of Canada Annual Conference
2015 CAMWS Award for Outstanding Achievement in Classical Studies
2014 CAMWS Award for Outstanding Achievement in Classical Studies

CV

Conferences

Alkathous and Pandion: Political Divisions as Mythic Divisions in Ancient Megara (2019 Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference at the University of British Columbia, March 2019)

Who Gets Credit for Apollo’s Birth? Gender Roles in Poetic Accounts of the Birth of Apollo (CAC Conference, May 2018; Finalist in Best Graduate Student Paper Competition)

Mythic Claims to Territory in the Megarid (2015 Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference at the University of British Columbia, May 2015)

Reaching Out and Pushing Away: Caesar and Cato as Antisocial and Prosocial Figures in Lucan’s Pharsalia (CAMWS Conference, March 2015)

Pausanias and Continuity of Cult in Greece (CAMWS Conference, April 2014)