LATN: Latin

Winter 2018

LATN101 First-Year Latin I Sections

Classical Latin for students with no previous knowledge of Latin, Part I.

Latin 101 Latin was the language of the Romans and, at the height of the Roman Empire during the first three centuries of the common era, was spoken throughout the whole of Western Europe and a large part of North Africa. After the fall of the Roman Empire in the west in the fifth century, Latin continued to be spoken in a variety of local dialects that developed through time into the modern Romance languages, e.g., French, Italian, and Spanish. Latin itself survived as the common language of educated people in Europe through the church and universities until the eighteenth century. A knowledge of Latin is essential to the study of the history, literature and archaeology of the Romans and for a serious understanding of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance in Europe. It is also extremely useful in the study of the Romance languages as well as the English language, which...
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LATN102 First-Year Latin II Sections

Classical Latin for students with no previous knowledge of Latin, Part II.

Latin 102 continues with the basics of Latin grammar that we began in Latin 101, and illustrates these by a series of readings adapted from the major authors of classical Latin literature.  Students will be reading passages from such famous authors and works as Julius Caesar’s memoir of his campaigns in Gaul, Pliny the Younger’s first-hand account of the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius, and the statesman Cicero’s letters to his family.   Text (required): Susan C. Shelmerdine, Introduction to Latin, 2nd ed., Focus Publishing, 2013. ISBN: 978-1-58510-390-4
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LATN201 Second-Year Latin I Sections

Completion of the grammatical foundations of classical Latin, Part I.

Latin 201 completes most of the fundamentals of Latin grammar and syntax that were begun in Latin 101 and 102, which it illustrates by a series of readings adapted from the major authors of classical Latin literature.  We shall be reading passages from such famous authors and works as Livy’s legends of early Rome, Julius Caesar’s account of his campaigns in Gaul, and Tacitus’ story of the emperor Nero’s murder of the son of Claudius.   Text: Susan C. Shelmerdine, Introduction to Latin, 2nd ed., Focus Publishing, 2013. ISBN: 978-1-58510-390-4 (required)
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LATN202 Second-Year Latin II Sections

Completion of the grammatical foundations of classical Latin, Part II, and an introduction to the reading of unadapted passages of Latin literature.

Latin 202 completes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and syntax, which it illustrates by a series of readings slightly adapted from the major authors of classical Latin literature.  These include passages from such famous authors and works as Cicero on dreams, the historian Sallust on the decline of Rome, and the poet Ovid’s telling of the myth of Daedalus and Icarus. We then introduce students to the reading and translation of unadapted Latin, this year using as sample the third book of Eutropius’ Ab Urbe Condita, his summary of the events of Second Punic War. (Text of Eutropius is supplied.)   Required Text: Susan C. Shelmerdine, Introduction to Latin, 2nd ed., Focus Publishing, 2013. ISBN: 978-1-      58510-390-4
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LATN350 Latin Literature of the Classical Period (Prose) Sections

Readings in Latin Prose.

Instructor(s): Williams, Arden
Third-year Latin aims to enhance students’ skills in reading unadapted Latin and to introduce them to some of the great authors of classical Latin literature.
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LATN351 Latin Literature of the Classical Period (Verse) Sections

Readings in Latin Verse.

Instructor(s): Gorrie, Charmaine
The goals of this course are to introduce students to Latin poetry and metre, and through the reading of the Latin text, to help students strengthen their grasp of grammar and syntax and improve their facility in translation.
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LATN401A Latin Prose - LATIN PROSE Sections

Studies in history, oratory and/or philosophy. May be repeated for up to 12 credits. It is recommended that the corequisite course be completed prior to LATN 401.

Apuleius’ Apology: The Trial of a Warlock In the middle of the second century CE the town of Sabratha, in what is now modern Libya, saw the trial of the philosopher and orator Apuleius on a charge of witchcraft, for supposedly enchanting his new wife, Pudentilla, into love with him. An outsider to the community, he faced the death penalty if he lost his case before the Roman governor, and had to plead for his life in a town controlled by his well-connected opponents (who – rather awkwardly - included his step-son). In this course we will read portions of his defence speech in Latin, along with related texts in English translation to understand Apuleius’ trial, strategy, and success in portraying himself as a true Roman, and his opponents as barely literate and moronic provincials motivated by hate and envy of him and Pudentilla’s happiness. Latin text: Apuleius, Apology, edited by Vincent...
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LATN402A Latin Verse - LATIN VERSE Sections

Studies in narrative verse, comedy, satire, elegiac and lyric poetry. May be repeated for up to 12 credits. It is recommended that the corequisite course be completed prior to LATN 402.

The verse epistle is a genre of literature that is thought-provoking and fascinating, as it ties into itself real settings and poetic constructs; here, truth and fiction meet in moments of pure artifice. This course will be a diachronic exploration of the Latin verse epistle. We shall be studying a selection of verse epistles from Horace's Epistulae, Book I, Ovid's Epistulae ex Ponto Book I and Heroides, the exchange between Ausonius and Paulinus of Nola in Late Antiquity, and the fifth-century epistles of Sidonius Apollinaris. We shall investigate these Latin texts not only as discrete poems but as instances of potential communication as well. How does the verse form affect reality? How does epistolography affect verse, whether fictionalised or not? How does the wider real audience of the epistles as poems affect their composition? Does it matter, e.g., if Augustus read Ovid’s letters or not? These are questions that will arise...
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