GREK: Greek

Winter 2019

GREK101 Beginning Ancient Greek I Sections

Classical and Hellenistic Greek, Part I.

Instructor(s): Reid, Shelley
This course introduces the elements of classical Greek, the language of Homer, Greek tragedy and philosophy, as well as of the Christian New Testament. By the end of the term you will know the ancient Greek alphabet and be able to read simple sentences in the present tense, using vocabulary commonly found in ancient Greek texts. You will read adapted Greek but also some unadapted excerpts from classical authors and the New Testament. Prerequisites: None.
Read More...

GREK102 Beginning Ancient Greek II Sections

Classical and Hellenistic Greek, Part II.

Instructor(s): Reid, Shelley
Greek 102 continues introducing the grammar of classical Greek, extending in particular the verb system, as well widening the range of vocabulary. By the end of the term you will understand several additional tenses and be able to use these in reading both adapted and unadapted classical Greek and New Testament.
Read More...

GREK201 Intermediate Ancient Greek I Sections

Completion of the grammatical foundations of Ancient Greek, Part I.

Instructor(s): Reid, Shelley
This course completes most of the required grammar and syntax of classical Greek, while students continue to read both adapted and unadapted texts from classical writers, such as Thucydides and Plato, as well as from the Gospel of John from the New Testament.
Read More...

GREK202 Intermediate Ancient Greek II Sections

Completion of the grammatical foundations of Ancient Greek, Part II; introduction to the reading of unadapted passages of Greek literature.

The term begins with a final wrap-up of grammar and syntax, along with an introduction into the Ionic dialect through adapted readings from Herodotus. Students then proceed to the reading of an unadapted Greek text, either in full or from a substantial part of a larger text. Texts vary from year to year, but in recent terms the texts have been chosen from Xenophon, Plato, Lysias, and Lucian.
Read More...

GREK351 Reading Ancient Greek: Prose Sections

Readings in the major authors in Greek prose.

This course is designed to introduce intermediate students to ancient Greek prose literature; the selection of authors to be read varies each year, but can draw from genres as diverse as history, philosophy, biography, satire, religious texts, or even romance or early science fiction. The works to be read will be entirely unadapted but students will have the assistance of a commentary and lexicon, as well as the support of the instructor, to assist them in making the transition to reading ancient Greek texts.
Read More...

GREK352 Reading Ancient Greek: Verse Sections

Readings in the major authors in Greek verse.

Instructor(s): Yoon, Florence
This course is designed to equip students with the necessary tools for independent reading of unadapted Greek texts.
Read More...

GREK401C Greek Prose - GREEK PROSE Sections

Studies in history, philosophy and/or oratory. It is recommended that the corequisite course be completed prior to GREK 401.

Instructor(s): Griffin, Michael
GREK 401C/501C: "Plato and the Search for Happiness" In this course, we’ll read two of Plato’s most influential dialogues in Greek: 1. The Apology, a version of Socrates’ defence speech at his trial in 399 BCE, including his account of his own life and philosophy. We’ll compare excerpts from Xenophon’s portrayal of Socrates, and from the orator Isocrates. 2. The Phaedrus, an essential source for Plato’s theory of literature, cosmology, philosophy of love, and ethics. Both dialogues present images of the human good life, and the role of philosophy in cultivating happiness and well-being.
Read More...

GREK402B Greek Verse - GREEK VERSE Sections

Studies in epic, tragedy and/or comedy. It is recommended that the corequisite course be completed prior to GREK 402.

Instructor(s): Yoon, Florence
GREK 402B/502B: "Homer" Students will read from both the Iliad and the Odyssey. The selection will depend on student interest, but will center either on a theme (i.e. human/divine interaction, hospitality), a structural element (i.e. assembly scenes, direct speech), or a character (i.e. Helen; Nestor/Priam/Laertes). We will also discuss general topics such as the Homeric question, the relation of epic to the "real world", and influences on and of Homer. Note: Students may take Greek 402 more than once, since the content varies each year.
Read More...