CLST: Classical Studies

Winter 2020

CLST101 Greek and Latin Roots of English Sections

Greek and Latin roots of English vocabulary and grammar, with an introduction to language history and Greek and Roman culture.

Instructor(s): Yoon, Florence
In this course (offered asynchronously online, with an optional synchronous component), students will learn to recognize and appreciate the many elements of English that derive from Greek and Latin roots. They will acquire the tools to expand and deepen vocabulary, and to develop the precision and sophistication of their communication in English, while enjoying the fascination of words and their histories.
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CLST105 Greek and Roman Mythology Sections

Greek and Roman mythology and its interpretation. Emphasis on ancient texts read in English translation.

Classical Studies 105 offers a broad introduction to the vibrant world of Greek and Roman mythology and its influence today. Because myth touched every aspect of ancient life, this course will also shed light on the literature, art, and lived experience of the Greeks and Romans. The goals of the course are to familiarize students with the myths, with the primary texts in which they are told, with the place of myth-telling in ancient culture, and to introduce students to the chief interpretive theories of myth that have been developed over the past century. The course also touches on the transformation of ancient myths in modern storytelling – for instance in film and music. Emphasis will be placed on reading primary sources in English translation, and as a result students will become familiar with a variety of ancient literary genres. This course also develops valuable transferable skills in academic reading...
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CLST211 Greek Philosophy I Sections

The Pre-Socratics; Socrates; Sophists; Plato. Recommended as preparation for CLST/PHIL 212 and PHIL 310.

Instructor(s): Griffin, Michael
An Introduction to Greek Philosophy This course traces the early evolution of Ancient Greek philosophy, or the “love of wisdom” (philosophia), from its roots in the myths of Homer (c. 800 BCE) to the dialogues of Plato (429-347 BCE). We focus on the search for self-knowledge (gnōthi seauton), which Greek writers attributed to the Pythia, Oracle at Delphi. This thread will lead us to explore the powers attributed by the Pythia to the gods of Greek mythology, balanced by her emphasis on human freedom and responsibility. We’ll find these Delphic themes shaping the mathematical and musical models of nature and human life developed by early Mediterranean scientists; through literary depictions of the Pythia’s influence on early statecraft in Sparta and Athens; through the Socratic method of radical inquiry, inspired at Delphi; and through the insights of women like Aristoclea of Delphi, Diotima of Mantinea, and Perictione of Athens, respectively recognized as...
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CLST212 Greek Philosophy II Sections

Aristotle; selections from Hellenistic and Late Antique Philosophy. Recommended as preparation for PHIL 310 and PHIL 311.

Instructor(s): Griffin, Michael
Plato; Aristotle; Stoics; and later Greek and Roman philosophers. Is it possible to be sure that we are living a good human life, come what may? What would it be like to “succeed at” being a human being, at being ourselves? In the period under consideration in this course (c. 399 BCE–c. 529 CE), the nascent traditions of Greek logic, science, and ethics were turned to the exploration of such fundamental questions as these and spread across the Mediterranean world in the wake of Alexander the Great and the Roman Empire, laying the groundwork for the subsequent development of Western intellectual history. Over this term, we will study Aristotle, the great Hellenistic schools of ancient Athens (Stoics, Epicureans, and Skeptics) and the later ancient synthesis of Greek philosophy under the banner of Plato (Neoplatonism), and their influence on subsequent thought. Focus: Aristotle, Stoics, Epicureans, Skeptics, and Neoplatonists (4th century BCE-3rd century...
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CLST231 Ancient Greece Sections

A survey of the ancient Greek world from the Minoan and Mycenaean (about 2000-1000 BCE) to the Hellenistic Period (323-30 BCE).

Instructor(s): Johnson, Carl
Why are Greeks still today, just like their ancient ancestors, known for their shipping companies and business interests? Why were ancient Greeks apparently always warring among themselves and with others? Was democracy the most common form of government in ancient Greek communities? If not, why not, and what was the most common form of government? Is the “Greek Miracle” the best lens today through which to understand the development of the ancient Greeks?  The answers to these and other topical questions of our times can be found in studying ancient Greek history. Come and explore them with me. Prerequisites: None


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CLST232 Ancient Rome Sections

A survey of the ancient Roman world from the foundation of the city to the death of Constantine.

Instructor(s): Huemoeller, Katharine
A survey of the history of the ancient Roman world from the foundation of the city to the fall of the Western Empire Prerequisites: None
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CLST260 Gladiators, Games, and Spectacle in the Greek and Roman World Sections

History, development, and social function of various forms of spectacle in ancient Greece and Rome, from the Olympic games to the Roman arena.

Instructor(s): McElduff, Siobhán
Fame and shame. Blood and guts. Glory and death. Ancient games and spectacles promised all these and more to the people of ancient Greece and Rome. Spectacles united societies and divided them too. Ancient fans fanatically supported their favourites, but rivalries sometimes led to riots. Ranging from the competitions at the Olympic games in Greece to the spectacles of the Roman Coliseum and the Circus Maximus, this course will examine how spectacles and games functioned in the ancient world, their costs and rewards, and the costs to the humans and animals caught up in them. Over the course of the semester we will investigate the how and why of ancient games, the mechanics of how they were staged and organized, and who fought and competed in them. textbook:https://pressbooks.bccampus.ca/spectaclesintheromanworldsourcebook Prerequisites: None  
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CLST301 The Technical Terms of Medicine and Biological Science Sections

Acquaints the student with the Greek and Latin elements from which most specialized terms of modern medicine are constructed. Intended primarily for students planning to enter the medical, pharmaceutical, or biological sciences.

Instructor(s): Reid, Shelley
Classical Studies 301 helps students understand the language of biology and medicine by teaching them the Greek and Latin elements from which the terminology is composed. You will learn how to deconstruct biological and medical words into everyday English so that you will more easily understand and remember the language used in those fields, and you also learn the principles behind the construction of the terminology. The course is designed primarily for science students, particularly those studying biology or those planning careers in any field of the health sciences, but students from other areas of study are also very welcome. CLST 301 also will provide you with a cultural context for this specialised language, through some selected ancient literary, mythological, historical, and medical sources. No knowledge of the Greek or Latin languages is required, and no specialised knowledge of anatomy or physiology is expected. Note that for 2020-21 the course...
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CLST306 Ancient Technology: Greece and Rome Sections

The origins, achievements, and social impacts of applied technology in the Greek and Roman world from the Bronze Age to Late Antiquity (c. 1500 BCE - 400 CE), with special attention to archaeological evidence.

Instructor(s): De Angelis, Franco
This course introduces the technologies developed and exploited in the Greek and Roman worlds, c. 1000 BCE to 400 CE, with an emphasis on their impact. Rather than focusing solely on the technological achievements of the Greeks and Romans, this course will instead explore ancient technologies in context: their intellectual, social, institutional, and economic backgrounds and effects. Throughout, we will test our modern experiences and ideas about technology and its impacts against ancient evidence to see whether we can make universal claims about technological achievement, or whether innovation is socially and culturally contingent. We will explore a number of topics that resonate in modernity, including: the relationship between human and machine labor; and the effects of mechanization; the social, economic, political, and environmental impact of innovation; the role of educational practices in shaping the development of new technologies ; the interrelationship of innovations in different “industries”; attitudes towards “progress” and the...
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CLST308 Roman Law Sections

The development of Roman private law during the classical period with special attention to family law, contract and delict.

Instructor(s): Bablitz, Leanne
The Roman state developed one of the earliest complex legal systems. They excelled especially in creating a formal judicial system and a detailed framework for civil law. The resulting system of law that emerged forms the basis of most European and American law and influenced many aspects of English Common Law. Through the activities and involvement of these countries with other peoples and nations Roman law had a considerable impact on legal systems of non-Western countries as well.For example, in a South African court, reference is often made to the Digest of Justinian because their legal system is strongly based on Roman law that was brought to South Africa through the Dutch. In this way, therefore, as Brent Shaw says, “Roman politicians, magistrates, and jurists developed many of the fundamental legal principles that are basic to a majority of the formal legal systems in the world today.” This course, therefore,...
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CLST311 Women in the Bronze Age, Classical Greek and Hellenistic Cultures Sections

The images projected in mythology, literature, and art are compared with realities of women's lives insofar as they can be reconstructed from historical, legal, and archaeological records.

Instructor(s): Gorrie, Charmaine
This course explores the cultural representations and realities of women's lives in Ancient Greece. The literary and artistic constructions of women in myth, literature, and the visual arts will be compared to the evidence for women’s actual experiences and daily lives from medical texts, legal documents and the archaeological record. Through a critical analysis of all of these sources our aim is to recover the lives of women from different social classes and from various areas of the ancient Greek world and to gain insight into attitudes toward women in a society in which they were politically and economically subordinated. We will also consider the role that Ancient Greece played in modern conceptions and perceptions of women in the western world today.
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CLST313 Greek Epic Sections

Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, in translation.

Instructor(s): Johnson, Carl

CLST319 The Roman Army Sections

Rome's military from the early Republic to the Imperial period. Topics range from those of a military nature such as equipment and strategy to social topics such as policing and marriage of soldiers.

Instructor(s): Bablitz, Leanne
This course is an introduction to the history of Rome’s military.  The course begins with an examination of Rome’s military development through the republican period and then turns to examine the reforms made to the army to facilitate its role in controlling the vast empire of the Imperial period.  Specific topics which are examined include; recruitment and training, strategy, discipline, daily life, family life, law, reality of battle, mutiny and unrest, policing, Praetorian Guard, emperors’ relationship with the army, navy, logistics, engineering, civilian building, and veterans.
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CLST331 Greek Art and Architecture Sections

The visual culture of the ancient Greek world in the second and first millennia BCE, especially from c. 1000 to 30 BCE.

Instructor(s): Daniels, Megan
This course explores the art and architecture of the Greek world from about 7000 to 30 BCE. We’ll begin with the first farmers of the Neolithic and the trace the rise of Mycenae, Knossos and other legendary palaces of the Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations. We then examine the emergence of the Greek city states, focusing on the great Panhellenic sanctuaries of Olympia and Delphi and, of course, Athens and the famous monuments of its Acropolis and Agora that embody the rise of the world’s first democracy. We’ll end with the spread of Greek art and architecture eastward with the conquests of Alexander the Great and the powerful Hellenistic kingdoms of his successors. In each case we’ll consider the social, political, economic and ideological context of Greek material culture, its relationship to identities and the impacts of interactions with other cultures. We’ll also consider the legacy and reception of Greek art...
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CLST332 Roman Art and Architecture Sections

The visual culture of the ancient Roman world from the 8th century BCE to the 4th century CE.

Instructor(s): McCarty, Matthew
CLST 332: Roman Art & Architecture The social, cultural, political, and visual history of Roman art from the eighth century BCE to the fourth century CE.  Topics include the power of images to shape society; identity construction; cultural exchanges and borrowings across the ancient world; the impact of the Roman Empire on local visual traditions; and the complex relationships between subject and representation.
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CLST334 Roman Religion Sections

Roman religions between the ninth century BCE and the fourth century CE, including mystery religions, magic, emperor worship, and early Christianity, with particular attention devoted to the primary sources. Some knowledge of ancient Rome is recommended.

Instructor(s): McCarty, Matthew

CLST352 The Roman Republic Sections

Rome from the foundation to the Augustan settlement. Constitutional development; the workings and failure of the Republican political system; acquisition and growth of Empire; the political, social, and economic consequences of imperialism.

Instructor(s): Huemoeller, Katharine
Roman republican history from the foundation to the Augustan settlement with particular attention to the political, social, and economic consequences of imperialism.
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CLST355 The Athenians and their Empire Sections

The sources (literary, epigraphical and other) for Athens' emergence as one of the two leading city-states in late archaic and classical Greece and the stages by which her empire grew.

Instructor(s): Johnson, Carl
Classical Studies 355 (CLST 355 [3]): The Athenians and their Empire The sources (literary, epigraphical and other) for Athens’ emergence as one of the two leading city-states in late archaic and classical Greece and the stages which her empire grew. Prerequisite: CLST 231.   Aims of this course: examine the history and nature of the Athenian Empire gain familiarity with ancient sources of the period and some contemporary scholarship ancient and modern perspectives and representation: how history is imagined and created (affected by ideology and ontology) the nature, objectivity and purpose of history   consider the following: the development and nature of the empire from the 6th century BCE on competing representations of that empire in ancient and modern sources the empire and its effect on 5th century Greek culture the relationship between the empire and Athenian democracy
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CLST356 Alexander the Great and his Empire Sections

The rise of Macedon under Philip II leading to its domination of Greece and the overthrow of the Persian Empire by his son, Alexander; the subsequent spread of Greek civilization in the East.

Instructor(s): Johnson, Carl
"I suppose there was no race of men, no city at that time, no single person whom Alexander"s name did not reach." - Arrian,Anabasis 7.30.2.v A study of Alexander the Great: the historical figure, his legend, and his legacy. It begins with his rise, tracing the nature of Macedonia, its culture and previous kings, especially Philip II on whose successes Alexander"s legend was built.This course first examines Alexander"s accession, campaigns and untimely death and places Alexander in his social and historical context.The second part of the course will examine the legacy of Alexander through the history of the Hellenistic kingdoms and the persistence of Greek culture in the East.This course addresses questions of cultural interaction, assimilation, and conquest through the reading of the ancient sources in order to assess Alexander"s achievements and to understand the unique place which he occupies in visions of the classical past. Texts: 1.Romm, J. 2012. The Landmark Arrian:...
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CLST360B Life and Society in Classical Antiquity - LF SOC CLAS ANTQ Sections

Topics in Greek and Roman life and society.

Instructor(s): Mulder, Tara
Sex, Gender, and (Ancient) Medicine. This course examines topics in the history of medicine that can be traced from antiquity to the modern day, with a particular focus on sex and gender: hysteria and mental illness, dissection and anatomy, reproduction, masculinity, menstruation, circumcision, trans bodies, intersex bodies, fat bodies, and sexuality. There are no prerequisites for the course, though a background in ancient Greek and/or Latin language, ancient Greek and/or Roman history, biology, psychology, or other pre-med courses is helpful.
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CLST401E Seminar in Classical History - SEM CLASSCL HIST Sections

Selected topics in Greek or Roman history, with an emphasis on research. Restricted to majors and honours students in CLST, CLAS, CLAH, ARGR, GRNE, CNRS.

Instructor(s): Gorrie, Charmaine
The Severan Emperors. The Severan dynasty lasted for over forty years and provided a time of reasonable stability before the crisis of the later third century. This course will study this significant but often overlooked period of Roman history through an examination of the reigns of Septimius Severus, Caracalla, Elagabalus, and Alexander Severus. We will consider the imperial ideology of these emperors as well as the political, social, and cultural developments that took place during their reigns. A variety of sources will be consulted such as the literary, numismatic, epigraphic, and archaeological record. Students will develop the skills required to evaluate and utilise these source materials and to present their research.
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CLST403B Seminar in Classical Art and Archaeology - SEM CLS ART&ARCH Sections

Selected topics in Greek or Roman art and archaeology, with an emphasis on research. Restricted to majors and honours students in CLST, CLAS, CLAH, ARGR, GRNE, CNRS.

Instructor(s): Fisher, Kevin
Interconnections in the Late Bronze Age Eastern Mediterranean. From the “Great Powers Club” to the famous Uluburun shipwreck, this course examines the sociopolitical, economic and ideological interactions that connected the various polities and cultures of the Late Bronze Eastern Mediterranean world from Greece to Babylonia, c. 1700–1100 BCE. Through material evidence from cities and shipwrecks, and textual sources including diplomatic letters and treaties, we’ll look at political relations and military conflicts among the great powers of the period and how the Egyptians, Hittites and other states forged and maintained some of the earliest empires, and the effects of these interactions on both conqueror and conquered. We’ll also investigate the nature of palatial economies and the implications of royal and commercial international exchanges by looking at the production, trade, and consumption of various commodities. From metals and ceramics to organic goods such as scented oils and luxury foods, we’ll discuss methods...
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CLST404B Seminar in the Reception of the Classical World - RECPTN CLAS WRLD Sections

Selected topics in the reception of the classicial world in its own time and in later eras, with an emphasis on research. Prerequisite: at least one 3-credit upper-level course of content appropriate for the topic of the seminar (to be established by individual instructors). Restricted to majors and honours students in CLST, CLAS, CLAH, ARGR, GRNE, CNRS.

Instructor(s): De Angelis, Franco
Race, Racism, and Ancient History. The Greeks and Romans are credited with inventing some of the earliest recognizable forms of modernity, such as rationality, democracy, progress, philosophy, law, roads, and art and architecture. Should racism also be included among their inventions? In this seminar course, we will critically investigate two main questions: 1) Did the Greeks and Romans invent race and racism? 2) What impacts have race and racism had on modern scholarship relating to ancient history? The course will range widely beyond the Greeks and Romans to include other peoples, such as Egyptians, Ethiopians, Scythians, Phoenicians, Jews, and Persians, whose ancient histories have been affected by questions of race and racism whether in relation to Greeks and Romans or on their own. Some of the related topics, themes, and questions include the following, but are not restricted to them. How did ancient Greeks and Romans express their identities and differences...
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