Graduate Seminars

Each year, the Department offers a range of seminars for graduate students in Ancient Mediterranean Studies, Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology, and Religious Studies. The following pages offer an overview of past and present graduate student seminars.

2018-19

Term 1

CNRS 500A: Christians in Greco-Roman Cities
Instructor: G. Anthony Keddie
Tuesdays 2-5pm

This course will take up a major current in recent scholarship on Early Christianity by studying the earliest Christian (New Testament, patristic, apocryphal, etc.) writings as products of and reactions to particular urban milieux in the Roman East. This course will focus on a selection of important cities for the spread of Early Christianity including Tiberias and Sepphoris (Galilee); Antioch on the Orontes; Ephesus; Philippi; Thessalonica; and, Corinth. Students will learn methods for illuminating ancient texts, practices, and social interactions through analysis of the archaeological remains of these cities (especially art, architecture, and epigraphy). There will be a special thematic focus on the intersections of religion with class, labor, and socioeconomic stratification in cities of the Graeco-Roman East and in Early Christianity.

CNRS 503A: Mystery Religions
Instructor: Robert Cousland
Monday, Friday 10:30am-12pm

Although so-called mystery religions were pervasive in the ancient Mediterranean world, their precise nature and character continue to challenge scholars. This course sets out to examine the mysteries in light of ongoing scholarly research. The course will focus on various ancient mysteries and their characteristics. Depending on the interests of the students, the class may examine the Eleusinian mysteries, the mysteries of Samothrace, the Dionysiac mysteries, Orphism, the cult of the mother goddess, the mysteries of Isis, Mithraism, and Christianity as a type of mystery religion.

GREK 501B: Greek Prose, Topic TBA
Instructor: Jonathan Vickers
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 2pm-3pm

LATN 502A: Latin Verse Epistles
Instructor: Matthew Hoskin
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9am-10am

The verse epistle is a genre of literature that is thought-provoking and fascinating, as it ties into itself real settings and poetic constructs; here, truth and fiction meet in moments of pure artifice. This course will be a diachronic exploration of the Latin verse epistle. We shall be studying a selection of verse epistles from Horace's Epistulae, Book I, Ovid's Epistulae ex Ponto Book I and Heroides, the exchange between Ausonius and Paulinus of Nola in Late Antiquity, and the fifth-century epistles of Sidonius Apollinaris. We shall investigate these Latin texts not only as discrete poems but as instances of potential communication as well. How does the verse form affect reality? How does epistolography affect verse, whether fictionalised or not? How does the wider real audience of the epistles as poems affect their composition? Does it matter, e.g., if Augustus read Ovid’s letters or not? These are questions that will arise alongside the close reading of the Latin text.

NEST 506: Early Cities of the Ancient Near East
Instructor: Lisa Cooper
Monday, Friday 2:30pm-4pm

This course will focus on the origins and development of the earliest cities in the ancient Near East, particularly those that emerged in Greater Mesopotamia in the fourth millennium BCE. Such cities include, for example, the ancient urban complexes of Uruk and Ur in southern Iraq, Brak and Hamoukar in Syria, and Susa in south-western Iran. The course will consider theoretical perspectives on the origins of cities and the rise of complex cities. It will then probe the physical manifestations of the development of urban complexes, evidenced through transformations in settlement and landscape patterns, urban planning and the use of space, art, artifacts and architecture. Lastly, the course hopes to take a cross-cultural approach, highlighting salient social, religious and political institutions of ancient Near Eastern cities and comparing them to similar institutions documented at other cities from the ancient world, including those from China and Mesoamerica. The course is not only intended to augment the students’ knowledge of approaches associated with the study of urbanism in the ancient world, it also aims to enhance their written, oral, and digital skills through in-class oral presentations, discussions of assigned readings, short written reports and the creation of an “Ancient Cities” website to which students will contribute posts of researched and/or critiqued materials. The course has no prerequisites, although background in the archaeology or history of the ancient Mediterranean world and the Near East, or in anthropological archaeology, will be advantageous.

Term 2

CLST 512A: The Provincialization of Roman Africa: Processes, Practices, and Power
Instructor: Matthew McCarty
Tuesday, 2pm-5pm

This course will explore the impact of Roman hegemony and the networks created by empire on the provinces of North Africa. Key themes will include cultural change from theoretical archaeological perspectives and the nexus of problems around “Romanization”; globalization models and the ancient world; social and economic transformations; and the historiography of Roman provincial archaeology.

CNRS 503C: The Greek City (600-300 BCE)
Instructor: Nigel Kennell
Thursday, 11am-2pm

The city (polis) played a central role in all aspects of Greek life and culture. It shaped and was shaped by historical trends over many centuries. In this course we will examine the polis through the longue durée, from the archaic period to the beginning of late antiquity. City-state formation, the role of cults and festivals, the evolution of institutions and their stresses, both internal and external, will be continuing themes. In addition, we will consider the physical infrastructure of a city: walls, streets, temples and shrines, and defensive fortifications. In the second part of the course, particular attention will be paid to the Hellenistic city’s role in the east after Alexander as a focal point for “Hellenicity” in a varied, multi-cultural environment. Participants will gain an understanding of the many diverse elements that interacted to ensure the almost millennium-long survival, despite the Roman conquest, of this unique political, religious, and social unit.

GREK 502A: Greek Verse, Theocritus
Instructor: Matthew Hoskin
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 1pm-2pm

This course will explore the poetry of Theocritus, the most famous and influential Hellenistc bucolic poet. His poetry is worth of consideration in and of itself and takes on new interest in light of his influence upon Vergil's Eclogues. Besides the versified vision of the pastoral life Theocritus provides, this course will delve into Theocritus' own poetological statements, urban mimes, and panegyric. Moreover, students are expected to gain a familiarity of the reception of Theocritus in Vergil through a reading of Eclogues in English translation. This course will introduce students to the vibrancy of Hellenistic poetry, introduce important concepts of intertextuality and allusion, and raise the question of the relationship between poetics and politics. Moreover, we will consider what it means for an ancient male poet to compose verse in a female voice in Idyll 2.

LATN 501A: Apuleius’ Apology: The Trial of a Warlock
Instructor: Siobhan McElduff
Tuesday, Thursday 9:30am-11am

In the middle of the second century CE the town of Sabratha, in what is now modern Libya, saw the trial of the philosopher and orator Apuleius on a charge of witchcraft, for supposedly enchanting his new wife, Pudentilla, into love with him. An outsider to the community, he faced the death penalty if he lost his case before the Roman governor, and had to plead for his life in a town controlled by his well-connected opponents (who – rather awkwardly - included his step-son). In this course we will read portions of his defence speech in Latin, along with related texts in English translation to understand Apuleius’ trial, strategy, and success in portraying himself as a true Roman, and his opponents as barely literate and moronic provincials motivated by hate and envy of him and Pudentilla’s happiness.

Latin text: Apuleius, Apology, edited by Vincent Hunink (available as a free download provided by the author at https://www.vincenthunink.nl/apologybook.htm

Assorted other readings in English translation, including portions of Apuleius’ Metamorphoses.

NEST 505: Literature of Ancient Egypt or the Ancient Near East
Instructor: TBA
Monday, Friday 3pm-4:30pm

Topic TBA

Ancient Mediterranean Culture, History and Literature

2017-2018

CNRS 500B: Gender in the Ancient Mediterranean (K. Huemoeller)
CNRS 503D: The Ancient Book (C. O'Hogan)

2016-2017

CNRS 500A/NEST 501B: Approaches to Ethnic Identity in the Ancient Mediterranean World (L. Cooper)
CNRS 502B/CLST 519D: Pompeii: Temples to Toilets (L. Bablitz)
CNRS 503A: Raw Comedy: Plautus and Mime (C.W. Marshall)

2015-2016

CNRS 500: Forum Romanum (L. Bablitz)
CNRS 502A/GREK 545: Greek Epigraphy (N. Kennell)
CNRS 502B/RELG 500A: Making a Case: Law in Ancient Israel and Iraq (S. Milstein)

2014-2015

CNRS 500: Ancient Mystery Religions (R. Cousland)
CNRS 503C: Digital Antiquity (S. McElduff)
CNRS 503D/GREK 525: Comic Fragments (C.W. Marshall)

2013-2014

CNRS 500/RELG 502C: Ancient Jerusalem (G. Gardner)
CNRS 503A: Rising from the Ruins: Neoclassicism and the roots of modern Classical Studies (H. Marshall)

2012-2013

CNRS 500/CNRS 503E/GREK 525A: Being like Gods: Divine Knowledge and Power in Roman Alexandria (M. Griffin & T. Schneider)
CNRS 503D/LATN 535: TBA (S. McElduff)

2011-2012

CNRS 500/RELG 500B: The Parables of Jesus (R. Cousland)
CNRS 502A: Roman Lawmaking (L. Bablitz)
CNRS 503D: Ancient Near Eastern Historiography (T. Schneider)
CNRS 503E/GREK 525B/LATN 525B: Scientific Literature in Greek and Roman Antiquity (D. Creese)

2010-2011

CNRS 500/RELG 531: Reading Foundational Narratives (D. Arbel and S. Braund)
CNRS 503C /GREK 525A/LATN 525A: Prostitutes and New Comedy (C. W. Marshall)
CNRS 504A/LATN 535/CLST 519D: Mystery Religions and the Rise of Christinaity on the Basis of Archaeology and Iconography (R. Wilson)

2009-2010

CNRS 500/RELG 500: Approaches to the Ancient City (D. Neufeld)
CNRS 503A/LATN 545D: Latin Epigraphy (R. Wilson)
CNRS 503C/GREK 525B: Aristotle and the Purpose of Tragedy (C.W. Marshall)
CNRS 503D/GREK 525A: Greek Love (D. Creese)
CNRS 503E: The Ancient Greek State: Theory and Reconstruction (F. De Angelis)
CNRS 503F: Ancient Near Eastern Historiography (T. Schneider)

2008-2009

CNRS 500: Approaches to the Ancient City (D. Neufeld)
CNRS 501/LATN 535: Mystery Religions and the Rise of Christianity (R. Wilson)
CNRS 503A/CLST 519: Death and Dying in the Roman World (L. Bablitz)
LATN 521A: Lucan and his Reception (S. Braund)
LATN 521B: Ancient Rhetorical Theory (S. McElduff)
LATN 525B/GREK 525B: The Classical Commentary: Art and Science (S. Braund)

2007-2008

CNRS 500/CNRS 503B/GREK 525B: Greek Musical Discourse (D. Creese)
CNRS 503A/LATN 525A: Seneca’s Tragedies and their Reception (S. Braund)
CNRS 503C: Latin Poetry Englished (S. Braund)
CNRS 505B/GREK 525A: Greek Stagecraft and Performance (C. W. Marshall)
LATN 545: Seminar in Latin Epigraphy (R. Wilson)

2006-2007

CNRS 500: Proseminar in Ancient Mediterranean Studies (D. Neufeld)
CNRS 503B/GREK 525B: Greek Love (D. Creese)
GREK 545B: Greek Epigraphy (F. De Angelis)

Greek/Latin

2017-2018

GREK 401A/501A: Biography (Xenophon and Plutarch) (F. Yoon)
GREK 401B/502B: Greek Tragedy (F. Yoon)
LATN 401C/501C: Inscribed History (K. Huemoeller)
LATN 402B/502B: Epyllion and Epic (C. O'Hogan)
2016-2017
GREK 501D: Greek Prose: Herodotus and Thucydides (F. De Angelis)
LATN 501B: Latin Prose (K. Huemoeller)
LATN 502B: Latin Verse: Horace’s Odes (C. O’Hogan)
2015-2016
GREK 501B: Greek Prose (TBA)
GREK 502A: Hellenistic Poetry (C.W. Marshall)
GREK 545A/CNRS 502A: Greek Epigraphy (N. Kennell)
GREK 525A/LATN 525A: Epic Transformed, Translations and Adaptations of Greco-Roman Epic Poetry (S. Braund)
LATN 501A: Reading and Writing Latin Prose Texts (S. Braund)
LATN 501C: Latin Prose (S. McElduff)
LATN 502B: Lucan, Civil War (S. Braund)
2014-2015
GREK 501C: Greek Orators: Murder, Adultery and Government Corruption (C.W. Marshall)
GREK 502D: Pindar and Lyric Poetry (M. Funke)
LATN 501D: Philippics and Their Influence (S. McElduff)
LATN 502C: Virgil’s Aeneid: from Zero to Hero – Aeneas on the battlefield (S. McElduff)
LATN 502D: Lucretius: De Rerum Natura (M. Funke)
2013-2014
GREK 401A/501A: Herodotus and Thucydides (F. De Angelis)
GREK 402B/502B: Aeschylus (C.W. Marshall)
LATN 401B/501B: Tacitus (C. Gorrie)
LATN 401E/501E: Latin Prose You Should Have Read: A Selection of Great Passages from Cato to Tacitus (S. McElduff)
LATN 402A/502A: Seneca’s Thyestes and its Reception (S. Braund)
2012-2013
GREK 401D/501D: Lucian (M. Funke)
GREK 402E/502E: Homer, Iliad (C.W. Marshall)
LATN 401A/501A: Latin Letters (G. McIntyre)
LATN 401B/501B:
LATN 402C/502C: Terence (C.W. Marshall)
2011-2012
GREK 401E/501E: Herodotus and Thucydides (F. De Angelis)
GREK 402D/502D: Sophocles (G. Kovacs)
LATN 401D/501D: Livy (C. Gorrie)
LATN 402D/502D: (F. Yoon)
LATN 402E/502E: (S. Braund)
2010-2011
GREK 401A/501A: Murder, Adultery and Assault (C.W. Marshall)
GREK 402A/502A: Homer’s Odyssey (M. Griffin)
GREK 402B/502B: Iambic, Elegiac and Lyric Poetry (B. Clausen)
LATN 401A/501A: Cicero, Philippics II (S. McElduff)
LATN 401B/501B: Latin Prose Composition (S. Braund)
LATN 402B/502B: Latin Verse Satire (L. Rae)
2009-2010
GREK 401A/501A: Plato, ProtagorasRepublic I (D. Creese)
GREK 401B/501B: Diodorus Siculus and Plutarch (F. De Angelis)
GREK 402A/502A: Aristophanes, Frogs (C. W. Marshall)
LATN 401B/501B: Tacitus (S. Braund)
LATN 402A/502A: Plautus, TruculentusPseudolus (C. W. Marshall)
LATN 402B/502B: Vergil, Aeneid (S. McElduff)
2008-2009
GREK 401B/501B: Herodotus/Thucydides (F. De Angelis)
GREK 401A/501A: Greek Prose (B. Clausen)
GREK 402A/502A: Tragedy (C.W. Marshall)
LATN 401A/501A: Roman Letters (S. McElduff)
LATN 401B/501B: Apuleius (S. Braund)
LATN 402E/502E: Elegy (S. McElduff)
2007-2008
GREK 401A/501A: Xenophon’s Anabasis (C. W. Marshall)
GREK 402A/502A: Hellenistic Verse (D. Creese)
GREK 402B/502B: Homer’s Odyssey (D. Creese)
LATN 401A/501A: Cicero (S. McElduff)
LATN 402B/502B: Myth, Magic and Witchcraft in the Roman World (S. McElduff)
LATN 402C/502C: Latin Poetry 43-27 BCE (S. Braund)

Archaeology

2017-2018

CLST 501: Topography and Monuments of Athens (N. Kennell)
CLST 502: Topography and Monuments of Rome (M. McCarty)
CLST 518A: The Archaeology of Ancient Cyprus (K. Fisher)

2016-2017

CLST 519D/CNRS 502B: Pompeii: Temples to Toilets (L. Bablitz)
NEST 501B/CNRS 500A: Approaches to Ethnic Identity in the Ancient Mediterranean World (L. Cooper)
NEST 506: The Archaeology of the City in the ancient Near East: The Archaeology of Space and Place (K. Fisher)

2015-2016

CLST 502: Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome (M. McCarty)
CLST 503B: Greek Sanctuaries (N. Kennell)
CLST 511A: Hellenizing Pre-Roman Italy, Archaeological and Historical Approaches (F. De Angelis)
NEST 500A: Interconnections in the Late Bronze Age Eastern Mediterranean (K. Fisher)
NEST 505: Ancient Egypt and the Bible, Interconnections between Egypt and Ancient Israel in the First Millennium BCE (T. Schneider)

2014-2015

CLST 501: Topography and Monuments of Ancient Athens (H. Williams)
CLST 519: Topics in Roman Archaeology: The Art and Architecture of the Severan Period (C. Gorrie)
CLST 518A: The Ancient Greek State in Comparative Perspective: Theory and Reconstruction (F. De Angelis)
NEST 501A: Near Eastern Archaeology, The Philistines (T. Schneider)
NEST 506: The Archaeology of the City in the Ancient Near East:  The Archaeology of Space and Place (K. Fisher)

2013-2014

CLST 502: Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome (R. Wilson)
CLST 503B: Greek Sanctuaries (H. Williams)
CLST 511: Greek Regional Archaeology (F. De Angelis)
NEST 501A: Iron Age Archaeology (L. Cooper)

2012-2013

CLST 501: Topography and Monuments of Ancient Athens (H. Williams)
CLST 509A: Greek Sculpture (C. Williams)
CLST 510A: Roman Sculpture (C. Gorrie)
CLST 512A: Roman Provincial Archaeology (R. Wilson)
NEST 503: Material Culture of Ancient Egypt (TBA)
NEST 506: The Archaeology of the City in the Ancient Near East (L. Cooper)

2011-2012

CLST 502: Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome (R. Wilson)
CLST 503B: Greek Sanctuaries (H. Williams)
CLST 512A: Roman Provincial Archaeology (R. Wilson)
CLST 518A: Greek and Roman Maritime Archaeology (H. Williams)
CLST 518B: The Ancient Greek State: Theory and Reconstruction (F. De Angelis)
NEST 501B: Iron Age Archaeology (L. Cooper)
NEST 502A: War and Diplomacy in Ancient Egypt (T. Hikade)

2010-2011

CLST 501: Topography and Monuments of Ancient Athens (H. Williams)
CLST 517: Artefacts at the Museum of Anthropology (H. Williams)
CLST 519A: Cultural Contact and Interaction in Pre-Roman Italy: Archaeological and Historical Approaches (F. De Angelis)
CLST 519D/CNRS 504A/LATN 535: Mystery Religions and the Rise of Christianity (R. Wilson)
NEST 500A: The Archaeology and Culture of the Philistines (T. Schneider)
NEST 503: Studies in the Material Culture of Ancient Egypt (T. Hikade)

2009-2010

CLST 502: Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome (R. Wilson)
CLST 505A: Greek Santuaries (H. Williams)
CLST 512A: Roman Germany (P. Kiernan)
CLST 512B: Roman Britain (R. Wilson)
CLST 517: Greek and Roman Maritime Archaeology (H. Williams)
CLST 518A/CNRS 503E: The Ancient Greek State: Theory and Reconstruction (F. De Angelis)
NEST 501A: The Archaeology of the Neo-Assyrian Empire (L. Cooper)
NEST 502A: War and Diplomacy in Ancient Egypt (T. Hikade)

2008-2009

CLST 501: Topography and Monuments of Ancient Athens (C. Williams)
CLST 506D: Studies in Roman Town Planning (R. Wilson)
CLST 509D: Greek Sculpture (C. Williams)
CLST 511/CNRS 505: Greek Regional Archaeology/Studies in Ethnicity (F. De Angelis)
CLST 512: Roman Africa (R. Wilson)
NEST 500A: The Archaeology and Culture of the Philistines (T. Schneider)
NEST 503: Studies in the Material Culture of Ancient Egypt (T. Hikade)

2007-2008

CLST 502: Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome (R. Wilson)
CLST 503B: Greek Sanctuaries (H. Williams)
CLST 512A: Roman Britain (R. Wilson)
CLST 513A: Maritime Archaeology (H. Williams)
NEST 501B: Archaeological Approaches to Ethnicity (L. Cooper)
NEST 502B: Warfare and Diplomacy in Ancient Egypt (T. Schneider)

2006-2007

CLST 501: Topography and Monuments of Ancient Athens (H. Williams)
CLST 505A: Studies in Greek Town Planning (H. Williams)
CLST 511A: Ancient Sicily (F. De Angelis)
NEST 501A: Archaeology of the Neo-Assyrian Empire (L. Cooper)
NEST 502A: Warfare and Diplomacy in Ancient Egypt (T. Hikade)
NEST 503A: Introduction to Middle Egyptian (T. Hikade).

Religious Studies

2017-2018

CNRS 503B / RELG 502A Synagogues and Judaism in the Greco-Roman World (G. Gardner)
RELG 500B/CNRS 504: The Use and Abuse of the Bible in Modern Contexts (S. Milstein)

2016-2017

RELG 502B: Topics in Judaism: Religion and Material Culture in Judaism (G. Gardner)
RELG 514D: Topics in Islam (R. Ahmed)

2015-2016

RELG 500A/CNRS 502B: Making a Case: Law in Ancient Israel and Iraq (S. Milstein)

2014-2015

RELG 500E: Images of Eve; Great Women of the Bible (D. Arbel)
RELG 502C/HEBR 509B: Adventures in Reading: Narratives from the Hebrew Bible/Advanced Biblical Hebrew (D. Arbel)
RELG 514A/LAW/RELG 475A: Gender and Islamic Law (A. Chaudhry)
RELG 514B/LAW 342/RELG 475B: Islamic Law and Legal Theory (R. Ahmed)

2013-2014

RELG 500C: Images of Eve: Great Women in the Bible (D. Arbel)
RELG 502C: Ancient Jerusalem (G. Gardner)
RELG 514A: Gender and Islamic Law (A. Chaudhry)
RELG 514B: Islamic Law & Legal Theory (R. Ahmed)
HEBR 509B: Narratives from the Hebrew Bible (D. Arbel)

2012-2013

RELG 500A: TBA
RELG 502A: Sacred Relics in Early Judaism & Christianity (G. Gardner)
RELG 502B: Jews, Judaism & the Graphic Novel (R. Menkis)
RELG 514A: Reading the Qur’an (A. Chaudhry)
RELG 514B: Islamic Law & Legal Theory (R. Ahmed)

2011-2012

RELG 500B/CNRS 500: Apocryphal Gospels (R. Cousland)
RELG 502A: Introduction to Rabbinic Literature (G. Gardner)
RELG 502B: Hebrew Bible/Old Testament in Film (D. Arbel)
RELG 514B: History of the Religion of Islam
HEBR 509A: Reading Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Narratives (D. Arbel)
HEBR 509B: Rabbinic Hebrew (G. Gardner)

2010-2011

RELG 500A: When Time Shall Be No More: Ancient and Modern Apocalypses (D. Neufeld)
RELG 531: Reading Foundational Narratives (D. Arbel and S. Braund)
HEBR 509A: Supervised Study in Classical Hebrew (P. Mosca)
HEBR 509B: Supervised Study in Classical Hebrew (D. Arbel)

2009-2010

RELG 502A: Gender, Magic, Ideologies: The Witch Figure in the Ancient World (D. Arbel)
RELG 514A: Theory of Islamic Origins (M. Yazigi)
RELG 531: Approaches to the Ancient City (D. Neufeld)
HEBR 509A: Supervised Study in Classical Hebrew (P. Mosca)
HEBR 509B: Supervised Study in Classical Hebrew (D. Arbel)

2008-2009

RELG 500: The Social World of the New Testament (D. Neufeld)
RELG 500A: Studies in the Gospel of Matthew (R. Cousland)
RELG 502A: Magic in Ancient Judaism (D. Arbel)
RELG 502D: Talmudic Law and Literature (R. Daum)
RELG 503: Early Christian Lives (P. Burns)
RELG 514: Theory of Islamic Origins (M. Yazigi)

2007-2008

RELG 500B: Religions of Ancient Israel (P. Mosca)
RELG 500E: Sacred Space and the Gospels (R. Cousland)
RELG 502A: Art of Rabbinic Narrative (R. Daum)
RELG 503B: Augustine’s “City of God” (P. Burns)
RELG 531: Methods in the Study of Religion (faculty)
HEBR 509A: Readings in Jeremiah (P. Mosca)
HEBR 509B: Advanced Readings in Classical Hebrew (R. Daum)