Archives by date

You are browsing the site archives by date.

Welcome to our new Assistant Professor of Ancient Greek Material Culture – Dr. Megan Daniels

Welcome to our new Assistant Professor of Ancient Greek Material Culture – Dr. Megan Daniels

The CNERS Department welcomes our newest colleague, Dr. Megan Daniels, who officially took up the position of Assistant Professor of Greek Material Culture on July 1, 2020.   Megan Daniels joins UBC from her previous position as lecturer in Classics and Ancient History at the University of New England in Australia. She obtained a B.A. […]

Franco De Angelis’s new edited volume A Companion to Greeks Across the Ancient World out

Franco De Angelis’s new edited volume A Companion to Greeks Across the Ancient World out

The Department of Classical, Near Eastern, and Religious Studies is pleased to announce that Franco De Angelis’s new edited volume A Companion to Greeks Across the Ancient World is out. Franco De Angelis (ed.), A Companion to Greeks Across the Ancient World (=Blackwell Companions to the Ancient World; Hoboken, NJ and Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell Publishers, 2020), […]

Sessional Lecturer Positions 2020-2021 Academic Year

  The Department of Classical, Near Eastern, and Religious Studies is now accepting applications for Sessional positions for 2020-2021 academic year. Subject to budgetary and enrolment considerations, the successful candidates will teach the following course: LATN 101 003 – Beginning Latin I                            […]

HISTORY OF MEDICINE

HISTORY OF MEDICINE

Hysteria and mental illness, dissection and anatomy, reproduction, masculinity, menstruation, circumcision, trans bodies, intersex bodies, fat bodies, and sexuality.

THE EVOLUTION OF JEWISH ETHICS

THE EVOLUTION OF JEWISH ETHICS

Fall Term 1. Jewish responses to poverty and injustice, safeguarding life, human dignity, medical ethics, business ethics, humility, family relations, and issues that have arisen from the pandemic. Includes an introduction to the key texts of the Jewish tradition – from the Hebrew Bible and classical rabbinic literature to contemporary Jewish prayer books.

Matt McCarty’s edited volume The Archaeology of Mithraism: New Finds and Approaches to Mithras-Worship released

Matt McCarty’s edited volume The Archaeology of Mithraism: New Finds and Approaches to Mithras-Worship released

The Department of Classical, Near Eastern, and Religious Studies is pleased to announce that Matt McCarty’s coedited volume The Archaeology of Mithraism: New Finds and Approaches to Mithras-Worship has been released as a BABesch supplement. In exploring a Persianate cult in the Roman Empire, the book seeks to shift focus away from questions of abstract […]

ARBC101

This course presumes no prior knowledge of Arabic, however if a student knows the alphabet and reads phonetically, but has no Arabic grammar they still belong in ARBC 101.

Fall 2020 Course Delivery Online

Fall 2020 Course Delivery Online

During Winter Term 1 2020 (September to December) all courses in ARBC, CLST, CNRS, GREK, HEBR, LATN, NEST, and RELG in Term 1 are online. The Department of Classical, Near Eastern and Religious Studies will not be offering any courses on campus. This is in response to the decision made by the University and the […]

RELG313

This course examines Jewish approaches to ethical issues, with special attention to how they evolved from ancient times to the present. In doing so, we will uncover the historical roots of contemporary Jewish ethics as well as follow the twists and turn in how these approaches developed. We will survey Jewish ethics broadly, as well […]

CLST360B

Sex, Gender, and (Ancient) Medicine. This course examines topics in the history of medicine that can be traced from antiquity to the modern day, with a particular focus on sex and gender: hysteria and mental illness, dissection and anatomy, reproduction, masculinity, menstruation, circumcision, trans bodies, intersex bodies, fat bodies, and sexuality. There are no prerequisites […]

CLST404B

Race, Racism, and Ancient History. The Greeks and Romans are credited with inventing some of the earliest recognizable forms of modernity, such as rationality, democracy, progress, philosophy, law, roads, and art and architecture. Should racism also be included among their inventions? In this seminar course, we will critically investigate two main questions: 1) Did the […]

CLST101

In this course (offered asynchronously online, with an optional synchronous component), students will learn to recognize and appreciate the many elements of English that derive from Greek and Latin roots. They will acquire the tools to expand and deepen vocabulary, and to develop the precision and sophistication of their communication in English, while enjoying the […]

GREK403A

Students will read substantial selections from different prose and poetic authors, all focusing on the same mythical figure. The selection will depend on student interest, but one possibility would be Helen, for which we would read selections from Homer and Euripides (verse), all of Gorgias’ Encomium and selections from Isocrates (prose). The primary aims of […]

NEST401

Humour in the Bible and the Ancient Near East. Although we might not think of biblical and Mesopotamian writers as humorous, there are some indications that certain texts were intentionally funny. What role did humour play in Near Eastern literature and cultures? What was the relationship between humour and politics, identity formation, and/or self-deprecation? Given […]

GREK401D

Herodotus and Thucydides: The Origins of Greek Historiography. This course will focus on translating selections from the historians Herodotus and Thucydides, who, as Leslie Kurke has put it (in O. Taplin [ed.], Literature in the Greek World [Oxford 2000], p. 115), were responsible for “charting the poles of history” for ancient, and by extension modern, […]

CLST403B

Interconnections in the Late Bronze Age Eastern Mediterranean. From the “Great Powers Club” to the famous Uluburun shipwreck, this course examines the sociopolitical, economic and ideological interactions that connected the various polities and cultures of the Late Bronze Eastern Mediterranean world from Greece to Babylonia, c. 1700–1100 BCE. Through material evidence from cities and shipwrecks, […]

NEST400A

Interconnections in the Late Bronze Age Eastern Mediterranean. From the “Great Powers Club” to the famous Uluburun shipwreck, this course examines the sociopolitical, economic and ideological interactions that connected the various polities and cultures of the Late Bronze Eastern Mediterranean world from Greece to Babylonia, c. 1700–1100 BCE. Through material evidence from cities and shipwrecks, […]

CLST401E

The Severan Emperors. The Severan dynasty lasted for over forty years and provided a time of reasonable stability before the crisis of the later third century. This course will study this significant but often overlooked period of Roman history through an examination of the reigns of Septimius Severus, Caracalla, Elagabalus, and Alexander Severus. We will […]

New Book by Florence Yoon

New Book by Florence Yoon

Dr. Florence Yoon’s new book, Euripides: Children of Heracles, was published in January by Bloomsbury. This book is an accessible guide through the many twists and turns of Euripides’ Children of Heracles, providing several frameworks through which to understand and appreciate the play. Children of Heracles follows the fortunes of Heracles’ family after his death. Euripides confronts characters and […]

Robert Cousland on BCIT’s ‘For the Record’

Robert Cousland on BCIT’s ‘For the Record’

Dr. Robert Cousland recently did a radio interview on Ancient Greek mythology and religion for British Columbia Institute of Technology’s show ‘For the Record’. Listen to his interview here.

WHY STUDY LATIN?

WHY STUDY LATIN?

Improve your English vocabulary and writing skills by learning the language of the Caesars, slaves, philosophers and demon hunters!