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Congratulations to Christian Brady

UBC Library cIRcle and the Graduate Student Society has awarded MA student Christian Brady one of four GSS cIRcle Open Scholar Awards for his classics Podcast Prometheus Unbound entitled, Podcasting Lucan and the Classical World. Congratulations Christian!

Relg514B

Islamic law has become something of a proxy in modern debates for larger theories and ideologies.  Muslims across the world call for a “return to Islamic law” as a panacea for the ills of modernity.  Several states in the United States have introduced bills that would ban Islamic law from being practiced and enforced within […]

Relg514A

This course sits at the intersection of two highly contested topics, “Shari’a” and the role of “women” in Islam.  Both these issues have become increasingly politicized in contemporary global discourse.  For this reason, it is important to study the historical roots of their development, as well as their various manifestations in the contemporary world.  As […]

Relg502D

Topic for 2013-14: Ancient Jerusalem in Archaeology and Texts This seminar will explore ancient Jerusalem from its beginnings as a Canaanite town through the Israelite (i.e. Iron Ages), Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine eras, up to the dawn of Islam (roughly 1000 B.C.E. to 640 C.E.). This seminar will incorporate close readings of archaeological finds […]

Relg500C

Sept-Dec In this seminar the figure of Eve will be treated as an emblem for women and the notion of femininity. We will examine the notion of femininity and its varied constructions in biblical context/s through analyzing varied representations of women in intriguing accounts from the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament. We will further focus our attention […]

Relg499A

Each Honours student in Religious Studies must write a graduating essay.  To register for Religious Studies 499, please contact the Undergraduate Advisor.

Relg475D

Is the Biblical Garden of Eden synonymous with Paradise? Does Genesis 2-3 represent Eve as a temptress? When does the plural noun Elohim refer to the singular God and to plural gods?  How to translate the Hebrew term Adam?  What does Exodus 3 recount about the secret name of God YHVH? What can the etymology of Hebrew […]

Relg475B

Islam and the Secular Modern. Why was a late 20th century Egyptian Muslim academic exiled for apostasy? Why did several young French Muslim men leave for Syria to join ISIS? And why have there been periodic tensions between Egyptian Christians and Muslims? A common assumption suggests that intolerance and violence in the Muslim world is due […]

Relg475A

From the very beginnings of cinema right up to the present day, movies about Jesus have been one of the constants of cinematic history. From 1903’s Life and Passion of the Christ — one of the very first feature films—to Mel Gibson’s Passion of the Christ and beyond, the  gospel story has continually undergone fresh […]

Nest502B

Political and Economic Interactions in the Late Bronze Age Eastern Mediterranean:  This course will provide a detailed look at archaeological and textual evidence for interactions among the various polities and cultures of the Late Bronze Eastern Mediterranean world, c. 1700-1100 BCE.  Through diplomatic letters, treaties, and material evidence for warfare and imperial control, we’ll examine […]

Latn502A

Seneca’s Thyestes is an archetypal revenge tragedy: Atreus hates his brother Thyestes so much that he kills Thyestes’ children and serves them up to him at a feast. The play is replete with gruesome descriptions and is not for the faint-hearted. During the course we’ll study the Latin play closely, seeing the downfall of Thyestes […]

Latn501E

Afraid to speak out in class because you’ve never read Pliny’s letters on the Christians? Or Livy’s stirring depiction of the death of Lucretia? Ashamed because you have never spent time lovingly pouring over Cicero’s accounts of Mark Antony’s teenage whoring? Or his puking? Or because you’ve never once looked at any of the accounts […]

Latn501B

Intrigue, scandal, treachery, adultery, murder – and that’s just the first page of Book IV of Tacitus’ Annales. In this course we will be reading about the exciting events of 23-28 CE as described by Tacitus in this book, including the deterioration of Tiberius’ principate and the increasing influence of the ‘evil genius’ Sejanus. We […]

Latn402A

The verse epistle is a genre of literature that is thought-provoking and fascinating, as it ties into itself real settings and poetic constructs; here, truth and fiction meet in moments of pure artifice. This course will be a diachronic exploration of the Latin verse epistle. We shall be studying a selection of verse epistles from […]

Latn401E

Afraid to speak out in class because you’ve never read Pliny’s letters on the Christians? Or Livy’s stirring depiction of the death of Lucretia? Ashamed because you have never spent time lovingly pouring over Cicero’s accounts of Mark Antony’s teenage whoring? Or his puking? Or because you’ve never once looked at any of the accounts […]

Latn401B

Intrigue, scandal, treachery, murder – and that’s just the first page of Book IV of Tacitus’ Annales. In this course we will be reading about the exciting events of 23-28 CE as described by Tacitus in this book, including the deterioration of Tiberius’ principate and the increasing influence of the ‘evil genius’ Sejanus. We will […]

Hebr509B

Is the Biblical Garden of Eden synonymous with Paradise? Does Genesis 2-3 represent Eve as a temptress? When does the plural noun Elohim refer to the singular God and to plural gods?  How to translate the Hebrew term Adam?  What does Exodus 3 recount about the secret name of God YHVH? What can the etymology of Hebrew […]

Hebr479B

Advanced Biblical Hebrew: Narratives from the Hebrew Bible Is the Biblical Garden of Eden synonymous with Paradise? Does Genesis 2-3 represent Eve as a sinful temptress? When does the plural noun Elohim refer to the singular God and to plural gods?  How to translate the Hebrew term Adam?  What does Exodus 3 recount about the secret […]

Grek525B

Note: GREK 525B is cross-listed as CNRS 502A  Until 60 years ago, the history of Greek comedy was defined by Aristophanes, whose eleven surviving plays are the clearest insight into what the Athenians found funny. Only in the 1950s was a single complete play of Menander discovered. The other playwrights survive only in fragments: Cratinus, […]

Grek502B

Note: Students may take Greek 502 more than once, since the content varies each year. Aeschylus’ Agamemnon and Libation Bearers are the first and second plays in the Oresteia, the most complete set of plays surviving to us from antiquity. The day they were performed at the City Dionysia in 458 BCE was arguably the […]

Grek501A

Note: Students may take Greek 501 more than once, since the content varies each year. This course will focus on translating selections from the historians Herodotus and Thucydides.  The course will be evenly divided between these two historians, with the first six and one-half weeks devoted to Herodotus and the second six and one-half weeks […]

Grek402B

GREK 402B/502B: Greek Tragedy Depending on the interests of the class, we will choose either a complete play to read, or a selection of scenes containing a common theme or element. Possibilities include “comic” scenes in tragedy, a figure such as Apollo or Heracles, or endings (e.g. questions of resolution, expectations, and interpolation). Students enrolled […]

Grek401A

GREK 401A/501A: Biography (Xenophon and Plutarch) In this course, we will read some of the earliest Greek attempts to write an account of a person’s whole life. We’ll start with the first book of Xenophon’s Cyropaedia, a biography of the founder of the Achaemenid Empire, which became the model for medieval writings like Machiavelli’s The […]

CLST402B

Chiseled body, beard, equal amounts of blood and wine: is this the ideal ancient man? In this course we will undertake a critical examination of masculinity in Greek and Roman literature. Reading selections from a variety of ancient texts as well as secondary literature, we will first explore what made (and unmade) men in the […]

CLST401A

A Beautiful Death?: Living and Dying in the Ancient Roman World This seminar will consider through various readings and student presentations such topics as life expectancy, hygiene, plagues, medicine, statistics of death in battle, invasions, mourning, burial practices and commemoration, funeral laws, murder, and suicide. The topics of focus will vary depending on the interests […]

CLST511A

PARTICULAR TOPIC OF INTEREST: “CULTURAL CONTACT AND INTERACTION IN PRE-ROMAN ITALY: ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL APPROACHES”  The purpose of this seminar course is to employ archaeological and historical approaches to study of cultural contact and interaction in pre-Roman Italy, in the period between about 1000 and 200 BC (we end just as the Romans brought political […]

RELG514

This course sits at the intersection of two highly contested topics, “Shari”a” and the role of “women” in Islam.Both these issues have become increasingly politicized in contemporary global discourse.For this reason, it is important to study the historical roots of their development, as well as their various manifestations in the contemporary world.As such, we will […]

RELG502

Topic for 2013-14: Ancient Jerusalem in Archaeology and Texts This seminar will explore ancient Jerusalem from its beginnings as a Canaanite town through the Israelite (i.e. Iron Ages), Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine eras, up to the dawn of Islam (roughly 1000 B.C.E. to 640 C.E.). This seminar will incorporate close readings of archaeological finds […]

RELG500

In this seminar the figure of Eve will be treated as an emblem for women and the notion of femininity. We will examine the notion of femininity and its varied constructions in biblical context/s through analyzing varied representations of women in intriguing accounts from the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament. We will further focus our attention on […]

RELG499

Each Honours student in Religious Studies must write a graduating essay.To register for Religious Studies 499, please contact the Undergraduate Advisor. Prerequisites: None

RELG485

In this seminar the figure of Eve will be treated as an emblem for women and the notion of femininity. We will examine the notion of femininity and its varied constructions in biblical context/s through analyzing varied representations of women in intriguing accounts from the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament. We will further focus our attention on […]

RELG475

This course sits at the intersection of two highly contested topics, “Shari”a” and the role of “women” in Islam.Both these issues have become increasingly politicized in contemporary global discourse.For this reason, it is important to study the historical roots of their development, as well as their various manifestations in the contemporary world.As such, we will […]

RELG448

RELG 448 Shiʿa Islam Shiʿism is a branch of Islam that encompasses a number of Muslim communities collectively making up approximately 18% of the Muslim world. This course will examine the origins, doctrines, and practices of Shiʿi Muslims. Students will read recent monographs exposing them to the key academic debates in Shiʿi studies. The readings […]

RELG414

The Synoptic Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke) are the historian’s main source for his portrait of the historical Jesus. The focus of this course is the examination of various genres in the Gospels – parables, trial narratives, miracle stories, and so on, in order to understand the interplay of tradition and interpretation in the early decades […]

RELG332

A survey of the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Jews from the beginning of the sixteenth century to the present, with special emphasis on changing attitudes to Jews and Judaism and social and cultural transformations. Prerequisites: None

RELG331

Prerequisites: None

RELG321

Christian prophetic figures are those people who have been able to articulate central features of Christian experience for their time. An attempt will be made to re-create the original historical context of each author. The authors selected have in some senses transcended the perspectives of their own period and continue to challenge our religious imagination. […]

RELG314

A study of the first century of the movement which later became known as “Christianity”, in its Jewish and Graeco-Roman contexts. Special attention will be given to understanding Judaism not just as “background” but as a religion in its own right, and to the transformation of a Jewish messianic sect into an almost exclusively Gentile […]

RELG311

In this course we will explore the adaptation of select key Biblical narratives, themes, and characters in modern Jewish and Israeli literature, art, and film. On the one hand, we will pursue close readings of Biblical texts, from a literary perspective, with the aim of opening a window onto the conceptual worlds of biblical authors […]

RELG309

Prerequisites: None

RELG308

Classical rabbinic literature (3rd–7th centuries C.E.) consists of a massive corpus of legal and exegetical texts (e.g. Mishnah, Talmud, and Midrashim) that comprise the foundations of medieval and modern-day Judaism. A rich area of study in its own right, rabbinic literature also contributes to the study of the Hebrew Bible and its interpretation, early Christianity […]

RELG306

Over the last two centuries, archaeologists (both professional and amateur) have extensively excavated the lands depicted in the Hebrew Bible and New Testament. Often digging with sacred texts in hand, they have uncovered a voluminous corpus of archaeological remains related to ancient Israel, early Judaism, and Christianity. This course introduces students to the comparative study […]

RELG305

For centuries, the classic image of the prophet—as one handpicked by God to deliver bleak oracles to a hostile public—was plucked directly from the prophetic books of the Hebrew Bible. While scholars imagined that these books had undergone revision over time, it was generally assumed that they were rooted in the words of actual prophets. […]

RELG207

In 610 CE, an Arab man named Muhammad son of Abdullah claimed to have received the words of God. It was the beginning of the Islamic religion. Over the next years his few followers were mocked, beaten, and some, even killed. And yet somehow, 1400 years later, this man’s movement has evolved into the second […]

RELG205

This course begins at the very beginning, with the historical figures at the heart of the Christian movement and the philosophers and theologians who have been shaping the religion for the last two thousand years. This is not, however, merely a “great men, great moments” course. We move quickly into Late Antique and Medieval Christianity, […]

RELG203

This course introduces students to the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, and the Qur’ān—some of the foundational texts of both western and world culture, and the sacred scriptural basis for religious traditions originating in the Near East: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—and, more broadly, the social processes, textual practices, performance modes, and ideological constructs that, in […]

RELG201

In this course we will probe the distinct but related corpora of biblical and ancient Near Eastern “mythologies.” The focus will be on Mesopotamian literature (i.e., literary texts that are the products of ancient Iraq), though we will also examine biblical texts, particularly those that demonstrate influence from Mesopotamia. Both sets of texts shed light […]

RELG100

This course introduces students to the major world religions. The focus will be on the origins and representative texts along with some historical development and current experience of each religion. Included will be introductory lectures on the nature and definition of religion with a sampling of some theories regarding the origins of religion. Guest lecturers […]

NEST502

Political and Economic Interactions in the Late Bronze Age Eastern Mediterranean:This course will provide a detailed look at archaeological and textual evidence for interactions among the various polities and cultures of the Late Bronze Eastern Mediterranean world, c. 1700-1100 BCE.Through diplomatic letters, treaties, and material evidence for warfare and imperial control, we”ll examine political relations […]

NEST501

The Archaeology of Assyria: The class focuses on the archaeology of the Neo-Assyrian Empire, which flourished in Northern Mesopotamia between 900-612 BCE and which at the height of its power dominated the Near East from Iran to Egypt.A rich array of Assyrian material culture will be discussed in order to understand the dynamic ways in […]

NEST317

An Introduction to Coptic, the language of Christian Egypt Egypt played a pivotal role in the history of early Christianity and monasticism, and other religious beliefs of Late Antiquity (such as Gnosticism, Manichaeism). Coptic – the language of Christian Egypt – is one of the most important Near Eastern languages into which the Bible was […]

NEST312

This survey course is designed to provide a general introduction to the religion of Ancient Egypt. We will discuss a wide field of topics such as concepts of cosmogony, cosmology, the pantheon of Ancient Egypt, temples and tombs, divine kingship, and the role of the priesthood. Throughout the course written sources will be complemented by […]

NEST304

Egypt has fascinated both scholars and the general public since ancient times, and not without good reason.  We will, of course, discuss mummies, pyramids, and famous pharaohs from Hatshepsut, the female king, to Akhenaten, the so-called heretic king and first monotheist, and Tutankhamen the “boy king” whose intact tomb was found by Howard Carter in […]

NEST303

This course is designed to provide a general introduction to the history of Ancient Egypt. After presenting and discussing the topographical and chronological setting of Ancient Egypt, the course will discuss modern approaches to reconstructing and understanding Egyptian history (the problem of sources, how to evaluate written and material evidence, different possible histories of Egypt, […]

NEST302

This course is designed to provide a general introduction to the archaeology of the ancient Near East, including Prehistory, Syria-Palestine (Lebanon, Syria, Israel and Jordan), Anatolia and the civilizations of Mesopotamia. The course will emphasize the major technological, artistic and architectural achievements of each of these areas as well as focus on the material manifestations […]

NEST301

This course provides a general introduction to the political history, culture and religion of the ancient Near East, with particular emphasis on the high civilizations of Mesopotamia (Sumer, Babylonia andAssyria). Lectures will cover major developments, from the appearance of the earliest cities in the Tigris-Euphrates flood plain up to the time of the defeat of […]

NEST101

Most of us know about the ancient tombs, temples and pyramids of Egypt, and have heard about the great cities of Babylon, Ur and Nineveh in Mesopotamia. But how did recent archaeologists go about re-discovering these amazing cities and monuments? This course provides an overview of some of the most spectacular archaeological finds of the past […]

LATN502

Seneca’s Thyestes is an archetypal revenge tragedy: Atreus hates his brother Thyestes so much that he kills Thyestes’ children and serves them up to him at a feast. The play is replete with gruesome descriptions and is not for the faint-hearted. During the course we’ll study the Latin play closely, seeing the downfall of Thyestes […]

LATN501

Intrigue, scandal, treachery, adultery, murder – and that”s just the first page of Book IV of Tacitus” Annales. In this course we will be reading about the exciting events of 23-28 CE as described by Tacitus in this book, including the deterioration of Tiberius” principate and the increasing influence of the “evil genius” Sejanus. We […]

LATN402

Seneca’s Thyestes is an archetypal revenge tragedy: Atreus hates his brother Thyestes so much that he kills Thyestes’ children and serves them up to him at a feast. The play is replete with gruesome descriptions and is not for the faint-hearted. During the course we’ll study the Latin play closely, seeing the downfall of Thyestes […]

LATN401

Intrigue, scandal, treachery, murder – and that”s just the first page of Book IV of Tacitus” Annales. In this course we will be reading about the exciting events of 23-28 CE as described by Tacitus in this book, including the deterioration of Tiberius” principate and the increasing influence of the “evil genius” Sejanus. We will […]

LATN301

Third-year Latin aims to enhance students’ skills in reading unadapted Latin and to introduce them to some of the great authors of classical Latin literature.  Our prose author this year (term one) will be the historian Livy.  We shall be translating a selection of famous passages from his Ab Urbe Condita, and also considering his […]

LATN200

In the first term, Latin 200 completes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and syntax that we began in Latin 100.  In the second term, we introduce selected passages of unadapted Latin from some of the major authors of Latin prose and poetry and, through the reading of these authors, we aim to help students strengthen […]

LATN100

Latin was the language of the Romans and, at the height of the Roman Empire during the first three centuries of our era, was spoken throughout the whole of Western Europe and a large part of North Africa. After the fall of the Roman Empire in the west in the fifth century CE, Latin continued […]

HEBR509

Is the Biblical Garden of Eden synonymous with Paradise? Does Genesis 2-3 represent Eve as a temptress? When does the plural noun Elohim refer to the singular God and to plural gods?How to translate the Hebrew term Adam? What does Exodus 3 recount about the secret name of God YHVH? What can the etymology of […]

HEBR479

Is the Biblical Garden of Eden synonymous with Paradise? Does Genesis 2-3 represent Eve as a temptress? When does the plural noun Elohim refer to the singular God and to plural gods?How to translate the Hebrew term Adam? What does Exodus 3 recount about the secret name of God YHVH? What can the etymology of […]

HEBR405

We will complete the basic grammar of Biblical Hebrew and read selected passages from the Hebrew Bible. Prerequisites: Hebrew 305

HEBR305

The emphasis in this course is on grammar and translation of Biblical Hebrew. Selections from the book of Genesis and/or Jonah will be read in class. Note: This is not a course in Modern Israeli Hebrew. Relatively little attention is given to developing oral/aural skills. Prerequisites: Open to first- and second-year students

GREK525

Note: GREK 525B is cross-listed as CNRS 502A Until 60 years ago, the history of Greek comedy was defined by Aristophanes, whose eleven surviving plays are the clearest insight into what the Athenians found funny. Only in the 1950s was a single complete play of Menander discovered. The other playwrights survive only in fragments: Cratinus, […]

GREK502

Note: Students may take Greek 502 more than once, since the content varies each year. Aeschylus” Agamemnon and Libation Bearers are the first and second plays in the Oresteia, the most complete set of plays surviving to us from antiquity. The day they were performed at the City Dionysia in 458 BCE was arguably the […]

GREK501

Note: Students may take Greek 501 more than once, since the content varies each year. This course will focus on translating selections from the historians Herodotus and Thucydides. The course will be evenly divided between these two historians, with the first six and one-half weeks devoted to Herodotus and the second six and one-half weeks […]

GREK402

Aeschylus” Agamemnon is the first play in the Oresteia, the most complete set of plays surviving to us from antiquity. The day it was performed at the City Dionysia in 458 BCE was arguably the single most important event in the cultural life of Classical Athens, providing a point of reference for all subsequent poets […]

GREK401

This course will focus on translating selections from the historians Herodotus and Thucydides.The course will be evenly divided between these two historians, with the first six and one-half weeks devoted to Herodotus and the second six and one-half weeks devoted to Thucydides.Students will also be introduced to recent trends in modern scholarship on Herodotus and […]

GREK301

This course is designed to introduce intermediate students to ancient Greek literature, prose and verse.  The selection of authors to be read varies each year, but can draw from genres as diverse as history, philosophy, biography, satire, religious texts, or even romance or early science fiction.  The works to be read will be entirely unadapted but […]

GREK200

During the year students will concentrate on revising and extending their knowledge of grammar and syntax. In addition, they will read brief excerpts from a wide range of Greek literature. Notes: Greek 200 satisfies the language requirement of the Faculty of Arts. Texts: 1.M. Balme and G. Lawall, Athenaze: An Introduction to Ancient Greek, Book […]

GREK100

This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of reading and writing Ancient Greek. An understanding of the Greek language—the language of Homer, Plato, Herodotus, amongst others, and the language of the Christian New Testament—is essential for those who wish to study the written sources for the ancient Greek world in the original language.  It […]

CNRS503

This course will explore the eighteenth and nineteenth-century roots of the modern study of Classics, seeking to understand the discipline as currently practiced in its historical context. Reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of Classics, this course will engage with a number of fields, including: the history of archaeology, with a particular focus on the early excavations […]

CNRS502

Note: CNRS 502A is cross-listed with GREK 525B Until 60 years ago, the history of Greek comedy was defined by Aristophanes, whose eleven surviving plays are the clearest insight into what the Athenians found funny. Only in the 1950s was a single complete play of Menander discovered. The other playwrights survive only in fragments: Cratinus, […]

CNRS500

Topic for 2013-14: Ancient Jerusalem in Archaeology and Texts This seminar will explore ancient Jerusalem from its beginnings as a Canaanite town through the Israelite (i.e. Iron Ages), Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine eras, up to the dawn of Islam (roughly 1000 B.C.E. to 640 C.E.). This seminar will incorporate close readings of archaeological finds […]

CNRS370

This course will examine the origins, nature and transmission of myth in the Western Tradition. It will devote particular attention to the interpretation of myth from ancient times up to the present day. Modern theorists discussed may, among others, include Freud; Jung; the so-called “Cambridge Ritualists;” N.Frye; J. Campbell; C. Levi-Strauss; R. Girard; W. Burkett; […]

CLST511

“CULTURAL CONTACT AND INTERACTION IN PRE-ROMAN ITALY: ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL APPROACHES” The purpose of this seminar course is to employ archaeological and historical approaches to study of cultural contact and interaction in pre-Roman Italy, in the period between about 1000 and 200 BC (we end just as the Romans brought political unification to the Italian […]

CLST503

A survey course on the sanctuaries of the ancient Greek world from the Iron Age to the Hellenistic period.After reviewing types of sanctuaries, structures in them, and sources for their study (archaeological, literary, epigraphic, etc.) the course will go on to examine various sanctuaries, especially in the Greek heartland (the great athletic panhellenic sites of […]

CLST502

This course is aimed at providing a detailed introduction to the topography and above all the monuments of ancient Rome. The monuments will be considered in their topographical context, rather than in chronological order. The harbour towns of Ostia and Portus, as well as Hadrian”s palatial villa near Tivoli, will also be included. The aim […]

CLST449

Each Honours student in CLST, CLAH, ARGR and GRNE must write a graduating essay. To register for Classical Studies 449, please contact the Undergraduate Advisor (Lyn Rae). Prerequisites: Honours program declared in CLST, CLAH, ARGR or GRNE.

CLST402

The texts which have survived to us from antiquity form a central pillar in our understanding of the Greco-Roman world, but often we give little thought to the place, function, and form of texts in their ancient context. This seminar will explore ancient texts from a variety of angles. We will examine the technologies of […]

CLST401

In 133 BCE Tiberius Gracchus, a sacrosanct Tribune of the Plebs, was lynched by a mob organized by a senatorial faction: the Roman elite had discovered open murder as a political tool and they were never to forget it. Beginning with the death of Tiberius Gracchus and ending in 41 BCE, when the last army […]

CLST356

“I suppose there was no race of men, no city at that time, no single person whom Alexander”s name did not reach.” – Arrian,Anabasis 7.30.2.v A study of Alexander the Great: the historical figure, his legend, and his legacy. It begins with his rise, tracing the nature of Macedonia, its culture and previous kings, especially […]

CLST353

The course focuses upon the Roman empire during the first century AD following its consolidation by the founding emperors Augustus and Tiberius. The performance of certain of their successors is discussed. But the emphasis is upon social, administrative and economic themes. There is investigation of how the provinces and cities of the empire were taxed […]

CLST330

This course traces the development of Greek and Roman art and architecture from about 1000 BCE to the end of the fourth century CE. It is designed as a general introduction to the astonishing and path-breaking achievements by Greek and Roman artists and architects, but these will be set against the social and political context […]

CLST318

This course, reading plays in English translation, will explore the theatrical comedy of ancient Greece and Rome. From the ancient Greek world we will read a selection of Old Comedy plays by Aristophanes and the New Comedy of Menander. From the Roman world we will read selected plays by Plautus and Terence. We will examine […]

CLST317

This course will guide students through the earliest plays of the European tradition, reading a range of Greek and Roman tragedies in translation. Selected plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Seneca will be studied in their intellectual, historical, and performance contexts. We will consider how classical tragedy has shaped the whole tradition of Western drama, […]

CLST312

CLST 312 Matron, Mother, Mistress, Merchant, Murderer. Women played a variety of roles in ancient Roman society and in this course we will examine the evidence that we have for women’s lives as well as how they were perceived by their male contemporaries and what value to society they were believed to have. Through a […]

CLST311

This course explores the cultural representations and realities of women’s lives in Ancient Greece from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic Period. The literary and artistic constructions of women in myth, literature, and the visual arts will be compared to the evidence for women’s actual experiences and daily lives from medical texts, legal documents and […]

CLST301

Classical Studies 301 helps students understand the Greek and Latin elements which are used in medical and biological terminology: students learn how to deconstruct medical and biological terminology into ordinary English so that they can easily understand and remember the language of biology and medicine. Students also learn the principles behind the construction of the […]

CLST260

Fame and shame. Blood and guts. Glory and death. Ancient games and spectacles promised all these and more to the people of ancient Greece and Rome. Spectacles united societies and divided them too. Ancient fans fanatically supported their favourites, but rivalries sometimes led to riots. Ranging from the competitions at the Olympic games in Greece […]

CLST232

“There can surely be nobody so petty or so apathetic in his outlook that he has no desire to discover by what means and under what system of government the Romans succeeded in less than fifty-three years in bringing under their rule almost the whole of the inhabited world, an achievement which is without parallel […]

CLST231

Why are Greeks still today, just like their ancient ancestors, known for their shipping companies and business interests? Why were ancient Greeks apparently always warring among themselves and with others? Was democracy the most common form of government in ancient Greek communities? If not, why not, and what was the most common form of government? […]

CLST212

Plato; Aristotle; selections from Hellenistic Philosophy. Is it possible to be sure that we are living a good human life, come what may? What would it be like to “succeed at” being a human being, at being ourselves? In the period under consideration in this course (c. 399 BCE–c. 529 CE), the nascent traditions of […]

CLST211

The Presocratics; Socrates; Sophists. “The unexamined life is not worth living”: this is how the seminal Athenian philosopher Socrates explained his way of life to the jury that sentenced him. How did this attitude – and with it the complex of Western philosophy, medicine and science – first emerge in ancient Greece? In this course, we […]

CLST204

This course will provide an introduction to Greek and Roman archaeology, from roughly 1000 BCE to CE 600. The course will place particular emphasis on the different types of evidence for our knowledge about the material culture of Greek and Roman antiquity. Two-thirds of the course will deal with such topics as the history of […]

CLST105

Classical Studies 105 offers a broad introduction to the vibrant world of Greek and Roman mythology and its influence today. Because myth touched every aspect of ancient life, this course will also shed light on the literature, art, and lived experience of the Greeks and Romans. The goals of the course are to familiarize students […]

ARBC400

The second year of Classical Arabic with extensive reading of poetry and prose drawn from religious and historical texts. Prerequisites: Arabic 300

ARBC300

An introduction to the grammar and vocabulary of Classical Arabic. This course will emphasize grammar and vocabulary and will introduce the student to select texts from Arabic literature including the Qur’an. Prerequisites: Open to first- and second-year students with permission of the instructor.

Chelsea Gardner has been awarded the Philip Lockhart Fellowship

PhD candidate Chelsea Gardner has been awarded the Philip Lockhart Fellowship

Roger Wilson awarded a SSHRC Insight Grant

Roger Wilson was awarded a SSHRC Insight Grant for: ‘Living in luxury in late Roman Sicily: excavating a high-status rural villa’.

Congratulations to Siobhan McElduff!

Siobhan McElduff has recently been promoted to Associate Professor.

About CNERS

About CNERS

An introduction to our Department, its history and aims, as well as location and contact information.

About UBC

About UBC

Learn more about UBC, its campus and reputation for excellence in teaching and research.

About Vancouver

About Vancouver

Get to know the city, its unique setting, cultural diversity and reputation as one of the world’s most liveable cities.

Test thing

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Arabic 400: Intermediate Classical Arabic

The second year of Classical Arabic with extensive reading of poetry and prose drawn from religious and historical texts. Prerequisites Arabic 300

Arabic 300: Introduction to the Grammar and Vocabulary of Classical Arabic

An introduction to the grammar and vocabulary of Classical Arabic. This course will emphasize grammar and vocabulary and will introduce the student to select texts from Arabic literature including the Qur’an. Prerequisites Open to first- and second-year students with permission of the instructor.

PhD Classical Archaeology Reading Lists

Major Field Reading Lists Archaic Greece J. Boardman, Greek sculpture: the Archaic period, 1978 J. Boardman , Early Greek vase painting, 1998 J. Boardman, The Greeks overseas 4th ed., 1999 J. Camp, The archaeology of Athens, 2001, ch. 3 and associated site summaries only J. N. Coldstream, Geometric Greece, 2nd ed. 2003 F. De Angelis, Megara Hyblaia and Selinous: the development of two Greek city-states in Archaic Sicily, 2003 F. De Polignac, Cults, […]

The Myth and Literature of Greece, Rome, and the Near East (GRNE)

This program is designed to investigate the myth and literature of the Greek, Roman, and Near Eastern world of antiquity. Students interested in Myth and Literature who may not have the required courses at the present time are invited to consult the undergraduate advisor. Advisor: Lyn Rae 604 822-4066 Major in The Myth and Literature of Greece, Rome and […]

The Archaeology and History of Greece, Rome and the Near East (ARGR, or CLAH pre-2009)

This program is designed to investigate the history and archaeology of the Greek, Roman, and Near Eastern world of antiquity. Students interested in Archaeology and History who may not have the required courses at the present time are invited to consult the undergraduate advisor. Advisor: Lyn Rae 604 822-4066 Major in The Archaeology and History of Greece, Rome and […]

Religious Studies (RELG)

Religious Studies courses are designed to investigate and compare the religions of the world throughout history.  Students interested in Religious Studies who may not have the required courses at the present time are invited to consult the undergraduate advisor. Advisor: Lyn Rae 604 822-4066 Major in Religious Studies Students take 42 credits, which normally include: First […]

Classics (CLAS)

The program in Classics is designed to investigate the life, literature, and thought of the Greek and Roman world of antiquity with an emphasis on mastery of the classical languages. Students interested in Classics who may not have the required courses at the present time are invited to consult the undergraduate advisor. Advisor: Lyn Rae 604 […]

Classical Studies (CLST)

Classical Studies courses are designed to investigate the history and culture of the ancient Greek and Roman world. Knowledge of Greek or Latin is not required for these courses. Advisor: Lyn Rae 604 822-4066 Major in Classical Studies Students take 42 credits, which normally include the following: First and Second Years Students take 6-12 credits of […]