CLST401B

CLST401B

Magic and Witchcraft in Greece and Rome

CLST110

This course concentrates on the remarkable political and cultural achievements of fifth century Athens addressing topics such as the development of democracy and how it functioned, the meaning of citizenship, gender and sexuality, social values and daily life, and the role of drama, art, and architecture in Athenian society. We will examine how some of the basic tenets of western culture were established during this formative period of European history, while also reflecting on how the culture and society of ancient Athens differed from our own.

Prerequisites: None

STATEMENT ON THE DESTRUCTION OF CULTURAL HERITAGE IN IRAQ AND SYRIA

We are a community of archaeologists at the University of British Columbia and Simon Fraser University who jointly work to investigate past and present human societies within British Columbia, Canada and the wider world.  We condemn in the strongest possible terms the tragic loss of life, the humanitarian crisis and the systematic destruction and looting of sacred mosques and churches, archaeological sites, and museums taking place in northern Syria and Iraq. We call on people from all walks of life to recognize that these historical places and objects are part of humanity’s shared cultural heritage and their destruction represents a tremendous loss for us all.

Cultural heritage forms a fundamental part of our collective and individual identity and its destruction is an attack on the culture and history of the Syrian and Iraqi communities whose identities are deeply rooted in many of the threatened buildings, sites and artefacts. These acts aim to extinguish the vibrant cultural diversity that has characterized these regions for centuries. We urge Canadians to voice their support of UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization), ISESCO (Islamic Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) and the UN Security Council in their unanimous condemnation of this assault on Middle Eastern and world history.

What can we do as Canadians?

We can call on our federal government, as a State Party to the 1954 Hague Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict, to implement the convention and strictly enforce the Cultural Property Export and Import Act to prevent the continued destruction and illegal removal and trafficking of cultural properties.

In keeping with the spirit of the 2003 UN Declaration Concerning the Intentional Destruction of Cultural Heritage, we can urge the Canadian government to join the world community and governments in the impacted areas, to prosecute those involved in the illegal trade of cultural heritage; to assist the people of Syria and Iraq in the restoration of our shared heritage; and to implement protective measures, such as the establishment of “protected cultural zones”, to ensure that this scale of looting and destruction will never happen again.

We can make financial donations to institutions whose members are working at the front lines of this crisis, such as UNESCO, and humanitarian relief organizations such as the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies.

We can educate ourselves to promote a wider understanding of the ancient and modern history of the Middle East, as a cradle of civilization.

And we can continue to promote values of human rights, tolerance, and cultural diversity in our daily lives.

 

Hatra: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/277

Nimrud: http://whc.unesco.org/en/tentativelists/1463/

Nineveh: http://whc.unesco.org/en/tentativelists/1465/

http://en.unesco.org/

http://www.isesco.org.ma/index.php?lang=en

 

Welcome to our new Roman Archaeologist – Dr. Matthew McCarty

The CNERS Department welcomes our newest colleague, Dr. Matthew McCarty, who will take up the position of Assistant Professor of the Art and Archaeology of the Roman World starting July 1, 2015.

McCarty_news_pic_cropped

Matthew M. McCarty (DPhil, Oxford) is a Classical archaeologist whose work focuses on the edges of the Roman Empire, ancient religion, and the relationships between material objects and knowledge. Currently serving as the Perkins-Cotsen Fellow in Princeton’s Society of Fellows in the Liberal Arts, he directs the Apulum Mithraeum III Project, an excavation aimed at understanding the ritual and social dimensions of a Roman “mystery cult” and at training students in the methods of field archaeology. He is currently completing a monograph based on his dissertation, Empire and Worship in Roman Africa (Cambridge UP), which focuses on child sacrifice and the agency of Roman hegemony in re-shaping fundamental premises about the gods, society, ritual, and personhood in the ancient Maghreb. His next book project, The Materiality of Religion in the Roman World, argues that because religious knowledge in the ancient world was not created and circulated by texts but instead by the manipulation of objects, images, and environments, a history of religion in the Roman world ought to start from the archaeological record. His published articles and chapters cover a range of themes from concepts of historical continuity to the cognitive dimensions of ritual practice to the problems with using the concept of “heritage” to shape archaeological agendas in North Africa. Prior to joining the Society of Fellows, he served as a Lecturer in Ancient History at Worcester College (Oxford), Lecturer in Classics & Ancient History at the University of Warwick, and Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities at Yale.

12-Month Lecturer in Early Formative Christianity

The Department of Classical, Near Eastern and Religious Studies at the University of British Columbia seeks applications for a part-time (75%) 12-Month Lecturer in the 2015/16 academic year. The position will cover courses in Early Formative Christianity. Applicants are required to have a Ph.D. in Religious Studies or a related field. The successful candidate will possess a strong commitment to teaching a broad range of courses within the field of specialization appropriate to this position and will provide evidence of excellence and effectiveness across all levels of undergraduate teaching. Expertise in any other specialty courses offered by the Department will be considered an asset. The position entails teaching 18 credits (equivalent of six 3-credit courses) and participating in student advising, departmental service, events and initiatives. This position is subject to final budgetary approval. Reappointment will be subject to performance and availability of funds.

The course assignment for this position in Early Formative Christianity may include: RELG 210, 302, 316, 317, 414, and 415. For information about the Department and course offerings, visit: http://www.cnrs.ubc.ca/.  The anticipated start date for the position will be July 01, 2015.

Please send applications, including a letter of interest, Curriculum Vitae, a statement of teaching interests and teaching philosophy, evidence of teaching ability and effectiveness, and the names and contact information of three referees to:

Dr. Dietmar Neufeld
Head, Department of Classical, Near Eastern and Religious Studies
University of British Columbia
1866 Main Mall, Buchanan C227
Vancouver, British Colombia V6T 1Z1

These materials may be sent electronically to marisa.scorda@ubc.ca, with subject line: “Early Christianity“.

Applications must be received by March 16, 2015.

The University of British Columbia hires on the basis of merit and is committed to employment equity and diversity within its community. We especially welcome applications from members of visible minority groups, women, Aboriginal persons, persons with disabilities, persons of minority sexual orientations and gender identities, and others with the skills and knowledge to engage productively with diverse communities. We encourage all qualified persons to apply; Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada will, however, be given priority.

CNERS Graduate Tia Sager wins Russ Patrick Award for Undergraduate Research in the Arts

Tia Sager, currently working on an MA in Classical Archaeology at the University of Oxford, has won the Russ Patrick Award for Undergraduate Research Writing. Her paper, “Space Syntax Analysis of Cypriot Built Environments: Social Interaction and Change in Bronze Age Cyprus,” was lauded by Janet Giltrow (Senior Associate Dean) and her committee “for its scholarly attitude and professional thoroughness and also praised for Tia’s ability to describe not only the significance of her research to an informed but non-specialist audience but also the nature of research in the Humanities.” The essay was included on the Arts website as “an example of spirited scholarship and good writing.”  Tia’s work was nominated by Prof. Kevin Fisher and was done under his Arts Undergraduate Research Award (AURA) grant.  Congratulations Tia! 

Kevin Fisher’s Augmented Reality App Makes the News

An augmented reality app that will help visitors and archaeologists better understand and visualize the Late Bronze Age archaeological site of Kalavasos-Ayios Dhimitrios, has been making the news at UBC and beyond.  The app is being developed by a team led by CNERS Professor Kevin Fisher and members of the UBC’s MAGIC (Media and Graphics Interdisciplinary Centre) Lab, including Postdoctoral Researcher Payam Rahmdel and Engineering Physics senior undergraduate student Afshin Haidari.  You can hear Prof. Fisher’s interview with CBC Radio International here.

Lisa Tweten Makes Successful Pitch at I-Cubed Challenge

A team led by CNERS graduate student Lisa Tweten successfully pitched a business plan for a new app at the Sept. 26th I-Cubed Challenge, co-sponsored by GRAND and UBC’s MAGIC Lab and held at Green College.  Participating teams pitched their business ideas to a panel of judges drawn from the digital media and investment communities to earn a 3-month residency in the MAGIC Lab, and in-kind technical and business support to help take the proposal to the next stage.  Lisa Tweten’s winning pitch was to develop a companion mobile app that will provide a visual complement to aid the study of epigraphic squeezes with relevant historical context.  Congratulations Lisa!  You can her article about the experience here.

Susanna Braund Awarded Medal by Collège de France

Susanna Braund was nominated by the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies to a visiting professorship at the Collège de France in Paris and she was then elected by the Assemblée des Professeurs, at the proposal of Professor John Scheid, to visit during the month of June 2014. During that month she gave a ‘cours’ of four lectures at the Collège, as well as participating in a conference on the reception of Horace at the Sorbonne. She also organized a Wall Colloquium Abroad on Virgil and his translators, in collaboration with Siobhán McElduff, at the Institut d’Études Avancées at its new premises on the Île Saint Louis. She finished her European tour by attending the Symposium Cumanum on Virgil and his translators at the Villa Vergiliana near Naples where she gave the keynote address. Her four French lectures, videos of which are all posted on the Collège de France website, were on the topic of “La réception des poètes latins dans la littérature européenne”:

Le cas étrange du livret latin de l’Œdipe roi de Stravinsky (June 2)

La signification du choix de la forme métrique dans les traductions européennes de L’Énéide de Virgile (June 16)

Le phénomène des traductions partielles : le cas de l’Énéide et des bucoliques de Virgile (June 19)

Tableau et spectacles : l’appréciation de Sénèque par les dramaturges européens des XVIe et XVIIe siècles, surtout Garnier, Dryden et Lee (June 23).

She was presented with a unique medal from the Paris mint which shows the Collège de France (founded in 1530) on one side and on the reverse Guillaume Budé, the pioneering French scholar who helped found the revival of interest in classical books and learning in the early sixteenth century. Budé was one of the founders of the Collège de France and his statue stands in one of the courtyards of the Collège. Susanna’s name is engraved on the rim of the medal.

Susanna_medal Susanna and Budé

 

12-Month Lecturer in Greek and Roman History

The Department of Classical, Near Eastern and Religious Studies is seeking applications for a 12-Month Lecturer position in Greek and Roman History. Applicants are required to have a Ph.D. in Classical Studies or a related field. The successful candidate will possess a strong commitment to teaching and be able to teach surveys of Greek and Roman history, as well as specialized upper-level courses on Athens in the classical period and Alexander the Great. The ability to teach introductory languages is also particularly desired. The position involves teaching 24 credits (equivalent of eight 3-credit courses) and participating fully in student advising, departmental service, events and initiatives.  The 1-year appointment is expected to commence September 1, 2015. This position is subject to final budgetary approval. Reappointment will be subject to performance and availability of funds.

Please send applications, including a letter of interest, Curriculum Vitae, a statement of teaching interests and teaching philosophy, evidence of teaching ability and effectiveness, and the names and contact information of three referees to:

Dr. Siobhán McElduff
Department of Classical, Near Eastern and Religious Studies
University of British Columbia
1866 Main Mall, Buchanan C227
Vancouver, British Colombia V6T 1Z1

These materials may be sent electronically to marisa.scorda@ubc.ca. Applications must be received by March 31, 2015.

Information about the Department is available on the web at: http://www.cnrs.ubc.ca/.

The University of British Columbia hires on the basis of merit and is committed to employment equity and diversity within its community. We especially welcome applications from visible minority group members, women, Aboriginal persons, persons with disabilities, persons of minority sexual orientations and gender identities, and others who may contribute to the further diversification of ideas. All qualified persons are encouraged to apply; however, priority will be given to Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada.

To download pdf of ad, click here: CNERS 2015 12 Month Lecturer Advertisement

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