NEST319

NEST319

The Archaeology of Ancient Iraq and Syria: Babylon and Beyond

This course provides an overview of the archaeology of the ancient Near East, with special emphasis on the ancient civilizations that developed in Syria and Iraq, notably Sumer, Babylonia and Assyria (3100—330 B.C.). The course also includes some Prehistory (beginning with the Neolithic Era), and the world’s first farming communities. Major technological, artistic and architectural achievements of ancient Near East are emphasized, as well as the impact of religion, the emergence of the world’s first writing systems and cities, and the rise of empires. While discussing these themes, the history of archaeological research in the Near East will be surveyed, from the earliest discoveries of 19th century adventurers to the scientific approaches to archaeological recovery and interpretation that are utilized by researchers of today.

Prerequisites: None, although NEST 101 is recommended.

GREK101

First-Year Ancient Greek I

This course introduces the elements of classical Greek – the language of Homer, Greek drama and philosophy, and the New Testament. We will study fundamental Greek grammar and vocabulary useful for reading ancient Greek and understanding its influence on modern European languages.

Prerequisites: None: Students with no prior knowledge of the subject are welcome.

CLST401C

Seminar in Classical History: DARK AGE AND ARCHAIC GREECE

Classical Greece is still alive and rightly deserves to be defined as the apex of ancient Greek civilization. Until relatively recently, Classical Greece had been treated like the birth of the goddess Athena: fully grown when she came out of the head of Zeus, her father. Recent research, by contrast, has shown that the foundations of Classical Greece were laid beforehand during several formative centuries which laid the groundwork, making these achievements possible. The primary aim of this seminar course is to study, using a problem-oriented method, the main historical developments and issues of these formative centuries, from the Dark Age to the Archaic period ending in the watershed Persian Wars (roughly 1100-480 BC), a time-period collectively known as “Early Greece.” This is a truly fascinating period, which witnesses such things as the fall and re-rise of civilization (the second time on a completely different footing from the first), the birth of the city-state (sometimes governed by democracy, another invention of the period), the migration of Greeks to areas outside Greece, like Italy, France, North Africa, and Black Sea (which raises issues of culture contact and culture change), and numerous other characteristic features which we traditionally associate with the Classical Greeks. A secondary aim of the seminar course is to introduce students to the challenges and benefits of dealing with an epoch of human history that includes prehistoric, protohistoric, and archaic phases, all at once, and that, as a result, requires an eclectic approach in order to bring together different types of interrelated sources (oral traditions; literature; inscriptions; coinage, and archaeology). Early Greece provides a valuable test case for the development of interdisciplinary approaches to the study of human behaviour.

Roman Historian joining CNERS July 1

Katharine P.D. Huemoeller, receiving her PhD this summer from Princeton University, is a Roman historian who focuses on the non-elite in antiquity, gender and sexuality, and life outside the major urban centers of the ancient world. Her work engages all available evidence for the Roman world, from Roman poetry to legal documents on papyri to material culture. On the material side, she is currently involved with the American Excavations at Morgantina: Contrada Agnese Project in central Sicily. She will be coming to Vancouver from Italy where she has spent the past year as a Rome Prize fellow at the American Academy in Rome working on her current project, an examination of the sexual dimension of Roman slavery. She will join the Department as of July 1, 2016. Welcome, Katherine!

Michael Griffin promoted to Associate Professor

We are delighted to announce that Dr. Michael Griffin will be promoted to the rank of Associate Professor, with tenure, in effect from July 1 2016. Congratulations, Michael!

Job Posting: Assistant Professor without Review in Islamic Studies

The Department of Classical, Near Eastern and Religious Studies (CNERS) at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver) invites applications for an Assistant Professor without review in Islamic Studies. The successful candidate must be able to teach Classical Arabic at all levels, and courses on topics such as Introduction to Western Religions, Classical Islam, Modern Islam, and/or another area of specialization. The 1-year appointment is expected to commence September 1, 2016, with the possibility of reappointment for an additional two years. This position is subject to final budgetary approval. Reappointment will be subject to excellent performance and availability of funds.

The successful candidate must hold a Ph.D., provide evidence of teaching effectiveness, and have demonstrated accomplishments in scholarship, as well as an enthusiasm for teaching in a department with the unique combination of fields present in CNERS. S/he will be expected to maintain an active program of research, graduate and undergraduate teaching (12 credits = four 3-credit courses), and participate fully in graduate supervision, departmental service and events. Information about the programs, faculty research interests, and general activities of CNERS are found at www.cnrs.ubc.ca .

Applications are to be submitted online by June 6, 2016 through the UBC Faculty Careers website at: www.facultycareers.ubc.ca/23357. Applicants should be prepared to upload the following documents in the order listed: a letter of application, curriculum vitae, and a sample scholarly paper (maximum 15 pages).  Shortlisted applicants may be asked for a teaching dossier.

In addition, applicants should arrange to have three confidential letters of recommendation sent directly by their referees, by the above deadline, via email to cners.jobsearch@ubc.ca with the subject line “Islamic Studies position.”

UBC hires on the basis of merit and is strongly committed to employment equity and diversity within its community. We especially welcome applications from members of visible minority groups, women, aboriginal persons, persons with disabilities, persons of minority sexual orientations and gender identities, and others with the skills and knowledge to engage productively with diverse communities. We encourage all qualified persons to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents of Canada will be given priority. Informal enquiries may be made to the Acting Head of the Department of CNERS, Prof. Leanne Bablitz, at leanne.bablitz(at)ubc.ca.

Job Posting: Assistant Professor without Review in Latin Language and Literature

The Department of Classical, Near Eastern and Religious Studies (CNERS) at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver) invites applications for an Assistant Professor without review in Latin language and literature. The successful candidate must be able to teach Latin at all levels, and courses on topics such as Latin literature, myth, ancient women, classical reception, classics in the media, and/or another area of specialization. The 1-year appointment is expected to commence September 1, 2016, with the possibility of reappointment for an additional year. This position is subject to final budgetary approval.  Reappointment will be subject to excellent performance and availability of funds.

The successful candidate must hold a Ph.D., provide evidence of teaching effectiveness, and have demonstrated accomplishments in scholarship, as well as an enthusiasm for teaching in a department with the unique combination of fields present in CNERS. S/he will be expected to maintain an active program of research, graduate and undergraduate teaching (12 credits = four 3-credit courses), and participate fully in graduate supervision, departmental service and events.  Information about the programs, faculty research interests, and general activities of CNERS are found at www.cnrs.ubc.ca.

Applications are to be submitted online by June 6, 2016 through the UBC Faculty Careers website at: www.facultycareers.ubc.ca/23358.  Applicants should be prepared to upload the following documents in the order listed: a letter of application, curriculum vitae, and a sample scholarly paper (maximum 15 pages). Shortlisted applicants may be asked for a teaching dossier.

In addition, applicants should arrange to have three confidential letters of recommendation sent directly by their referees, by the above deadline, via email to cners.jobsearch@ubc.ca with the subject line: “Latin Lit. position.”

UBC hires on the basis of merit and is strongly committed to employment equity and diversity within its community. We especially welcome applications from members of visible minority groups, women, aboriginal persons, persons with disabilities, persons of minority sexual orientations and gender identities, and others with the skills and knowledge to engage productively with diverse communities. We encourage all qualified persons to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents of Canada will be given priority. Informal enquiries may be made to the Acting Head of the Department of CNERS, Prof. Leanne Bablitz, at leanne.bablitz(at)ubc.ca.

Recent PhD, Andrew McClellan, accepts 2 year Post-Doctoral Fellowship.

We are pleased to announce that recent PhD student Andrew McClellan has accepted a two-year Post-Doctoral Fellowship, emphasizing Latin epic and its broader contexts, in the Department of Classics at Florida State University. Congratulations, Andrew!

 

Prof. Rumee Ahmed appointed Associate Dean, Communications and Innovation

We are pleased to announce that Professor Rumee Ahmed has been appointed Associate Dean, Communications and Innovation in the Faculty of Arts from 16 April 2016 through June 2019. Congratulations, Rumee!

Prof. Susanna Braund awarded 2016 Killam Research Fellowship

We are pleased to announce that Professor Susanna Braund has been awarded a Killam Research Fellowship in the 2016 national competition for her project ‘Virgil Translated’! Killam Research Fellowships provide two years relieved from all teaching and administrative duties. Congratulations, Susanna!

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