PhD Religious Studies Special Reading List

PhD Religious Studies Special Reading List

Note: This is a SAMPLE reading list, designed for a student with particular interests in CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND THE NEW TESTAMENT. Another student’s reading list might vary considerably in particulars; this is intended only to give a sense of the scope and nature of the readings assigned.

CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND THE NEW TESTAMENT

Boyer, P. (2001). Religion Explained: The Evolutionary Origins of Religious Thought. New York, Basic Books.

Craffert, P. F. (2009). “Jesus’ Resurrection in a Social-Scientific Perspective: Is there Anything New to be Said? .” Journal for the Study of the Historical Jesus 1(7): 126-151.

Craffert, P. F. (2011). ““I ‘witnessed’ the raising of the dead”: Resurrection Accounts in a Neuroanthropological Perspective.” Neotestamentica 45(1): 1-28.

Crook, Z. A. (2004). Reconceptualising Conversion: Patronage, Loyalty, and Conversion in the Religions of the Ancient Mediterranean. Berlin; New York, W. de Gruyter.

Czachesz, I. (2011). “The Promise of the Cognitive Science of Religion for Biblical Studies.” CSSR Bulletin 4(37): 20-35.

DeMaris, R. E. (2008). The New Testament in its Ritual World. New York, Routledge.

Duling, D. C. (2010). Ethnicity and Paul’s Letter to the Romans. Understanding the Social World of the New Testament. D. Neufeld and R. E. DeMaris. New York, Routledge: 68-89.

Esler, P. F. (2003). Conflict and Identity in Romans: The Social Setting of Paul’s letter. Minneapolis, Fortress.

Fiensy, D. A. (2010). Ancient Economy and the New Testament. Understanding the Social World of the New Testament. D. Neufeld and R. E. DeMaris. New York, Routledge.

Garland, R. (2010). The Eye of the Beholder. Deformity and Disability in the Graeco-Roman World. London, Bristol Classical Press.

Kirk, A. K. (2010). Memory Theory: Cultural and Cognitive Approaches to the Gospel Tradition. Undertsanding the Social World of the New Testament. D. Neufeld and R. E. DeMaris. New York, Routledge: 57-67.

Kirk, A. K. and T. Thatcher, Eds. (2005). Memory, Tradition, and Text: Uses of the Past in Early Christianity. SEMEIA Studies. Atlanta, Society of Biblical Literature.

Lawrence, L. J. and M. I. Aguilar (2004). Anthropology and Biblical Studies: Avenues of Approach. Leiden, Deo.

Luomanen, P., I. Pyysiainen, et al., Eds. (2007). Explaining Christian Origins and Early Judaism. Contributions from Cognitive and Social Science. Leiden, Brill.

Malina, B. J. (2001). The New Testament World: Insights from Cultural Anthropology. Louisville, Westminster/John Knox Press.

Malina, B. J. and R. L. Rohrbaugh (2003). Social science commentary on the Synoptic Gospels. Minneapolis, Fortress Press.

Moxnes, H. (2003). Putting Jesus in His Place. A Radical Vision of Household and Kingdom. Louisville, Westminster John Knox Press.

Neufeld, D. (2008). Sins and Forgiveness: Release and Status Reinstatement of the Paralytic in Mark 2:1-12. The Social Sciences and Biblical Translation. D. Neufeld. Leiden, Brill. 41: 51-64.

Oakman, D. E. (2002). Money in the moral Universe of the New Testament. The Social Setting of Jesus and the Gospels. W. Stegemann, B. J. Malina and G. Theissen. Minneapolis, Augsburg Fortress: 335-348.

Oakman, D. E. (2008). Jesus and Agrarian Palestine: The Factor of Debt. The Social World of the New Testament. J. H. Neyrey and E. C. Stewart. Peabody, Hendrickson: 63-84.

Oakman, D. E. (2008). Jesus and the Peasants. Eugene, Cascade Press.

Osiek, C. and J. Pouya (2010). Constructions of Gender in the Roman Imperial World. Understanding the Social World of the New Testament. D. Neufeld and R. E. DeMaris. New York, Routledge: 44-56.

Pilch, J. J. (2000). Healing in the New Testament: Insights from Medical and Mediterranean Anthropology. Minneapolis, Fortress Press.

Pilch, J. J. (2002). Altered States of Consciousness in the Synoptics. The Social Setting of Jesus and The Gospels. W. Stegemann, B. J. Malina and G. Theissen. Minneapolis, Fortress: 103-116.

Pilch, J. J. and B. J. Malina (2009). Handbook of Biblical Social Values. Baker Academic.

Rohrbaugh, R. L. (2001). Gossip in the New Testament. Social Scientific Models for Interpreting the Bible: Essays by the Context Group in Honor of Bruce J. Malina. J. J. Pilch. Leiden, Brill: 239-259.

Shantz, C. (2009). Paul in ecstasy : The Neurobiology of the Apostle’s Life and Thought. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.

Stewart, E. C. (2009). Gathered Around Jesus: An Alternative Spatial Practice in the Gospel of Mark. Eugene, Wipf & Stock.

PhD Classical Archaeology Reading Lists

Major Field Reading Lists

Archaic Greece

  • J. Boardman, Greek sculpture: the Archaic period, 1978
  • J. Boardman , Early Greek vase painting, 1998
  • J. Boardman, The Greeks overseas 4th ed., 1999
  • J. Camp, The archaeology of Athens, 2001, ch. 3 and associated site summaries only
  • J. N. Coldstream, Geometric Greece, 2nd ed. 2003
  • F. De Angelis, Megara Hyblaia and Selinous: the development of two Greek city-states in Archaic Sicily, 2003
  • F. De Polignac, Cults, territory and the origins of the Greek city-state, 1995
  • C. Dougherty and L. Kurke (eds), Cultural poetics in Archaic Greece, 1993
  • J. M. Hall, A history of the Archaic Greek world: ca. 1200-479 BCE, 2007
  • J. M. Hurwit, The art and culture of Early Greece, 1100-480 BC, 1985
  • L. H. Jeffery, Archaic Greece: The City-states, c. 700-500 BC, 1976
  • C. Morgan, Athletes and oracles: the transformation of Olympia and Delphi in the eighth century BC, 1990
  • I. Morris, Burial and ancient society: the rise of the Greek city-State, 1987
  • I. Morris, Archaeology as cultural history: words and things in Iron Age Greece, 2000
  • S. P. Morris, Daidalos and the origins of Greek art, 1992
  • R. Osborne, Greece in the making, 1200-479 BC, 1996
  • B. B. Powell, Homer and the origin of the Greek alphabet, 1991
  • H. A. Shapiro (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Archaic Greece, 2007
  • A. M. Snodgrass, Archaic Greece: the age of experiment, 1980
  • A. M. Snodgrass, The Dark Age of Greece, 1971; reprinted 2000
  • C. G. Starr, The economic and social growth of early Greece, 800-500 BC, 1977
  • C. G. Starr, Individual and community: the rise of the polis, 800–500 BC, 1986
  • D. W. Tandy, Warriors into traders: the power of the market in early Greece, 1997
  • J. Whitley, The archaeology of ancient Greece, 2001, chs 1–10 only
  • N. A. Winter, Greek architectural terracottas from the prehistoric through to the Archaic Period, 1993

Classical Greece

  • N. Cahill, Household and City Organization at Olynthus (New Haven, CT, 2002)
  • J. Camp, The Archaeology of Athens (New Haven, CT, 2001) (Chapter 4 and associated site
  • summaries only)
  • B. Cohen, ed., Not the Classical Ideal: Athens and the Construction of the Other in Greek Art (Leiden, 2000)
  • M. H. Hansen, Polis: An Introduction to the Ancient Greek City-state (Oxford, 2006)
  • J. M. Hurwit, The Acropolis in the Age of Pericles (Cambridge, 2004)
  • K. Kinzl, ed., A Companion to Classical Greek World (Oxford and Malden, MA, 2006)
  • A. W. Lawrence and R.A. Tomlinson, Greek Architecture, 4th ed. (Harmondsworth, 1983)
  • C. Mee, Greek Archaeology: A Thematic Approach (Chichester and Malden, MA, 2011)
  • M. C. Miller, Athens and Persia in the Fifth Century B.C. A Study in Cultural Receptivity (Cambridge, 1997)
  • I. Morris, “Archaeologies of Greece,” in I. Morris (ed.), Classical Greece: Ancient Histories and Modern Archaeologies (Cambridge, 1994), pp. 8-47
  • L. C. Nevett, House and Society in the Ancient Greek World (Cambridge, 1999)
  • R. Osborne, “Greek Archaeology: A Survey of Recent Work,” American Journal of Archaeology 108 (2004), pp. 87-102
  • R. Osborne, Archaic and Classical Greek Art (Oxford, 1998)
  • J. J. Pollitt, Art and Experience in Classical Greece (Cambridge, 1972)
  • J. J. Pollitt, The Art of Ancient Greece: Sources and Documents (Cambridge, 1990) (Chapters 4-6, 8-9, 11-13 only)
  • G. Pugliese Carratelli, ed., The Western Greeks: Classical Civilization in the Western Mediterranean (London, 1996)
  • M. Robertson, The Art of Vase-Painting in Classical Athens (Cambridge, 1992)
  • H. A. Shapiro, Myth into Art: Poet and Painter in Classical Greece (London, 1994)
  • J. P. Small, The Parallel Worlds of Classical Art and Text (Cambridge, 2003)
  • M. D. Stansbury-O’Donnell, Looking at Greek Art (Cambridge, 2010)
  • A. F. Stewart, Greek Sculpture: An Exploration (New Haven, CT, 1990) (Classical material only)
  • A. F. Stewart, Classical Greece and the Birth of Western Art (Cambridge, 2008)
  • J. Tanner, The Invention of Art History in Ancient Greece: Religion, Society and Artistic Rationalisation (Cambridge, 2006)
  • J. Whitley, The Archaeology of Ancient Greece (Cambridge, 2001) (All except for chapters 5-10)

Hellenistic Greece

  • S. E. Alcock, ‘Breaking up the Hellenistic world: survey and society,’ in I. Morris (ed.), Classical Greece: Ancient histories and modern archaeologies, 1994, 171–90
  • Z. H. Archibald et al. (eds), Hellenistic economies, 2001
  • V. J. Bruno, Hellenistic painting techniques: the evidence of the Delos fragments, 1985
  • G. R. Bugh (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to the Hellenistic World, 2006, chs 7–8, 13–15 only
  • J. M. Camp, The archaeology of Athens, 2001, ch. 5 only
  • F. Chamoux, Hellenistic Civilization, 2003, ch. 8 only
  • K. M. D. Dunbabin, Mosaics of the Greek and Roman World, 1999), chs 2–3
  • A. Erskine (ed.), A Companion to the Hellenistic world, 2003, chs 18, 20, 22 only
  • J. Fedak, Monumental tombs of the Hellenistic age: a study of selected tombs from Pre-Classical to the Early Imperial period (=Phoenix suppl. vol. 27), 1990
  • R. Ginouvès, Macedonia: From Philip II to the Roman Conquest, 1994
  • G. Hölbl, A History of the Ptolemaic Empire, 2001
  • B. Hughes-Fowler, The Hellenistic Aesthetic, 1989
  • A. Kurhrt and S. Sherwin-White, From Samarkand to Sardis: new approaches to the Seleucid Empire, 1993
  • B. L. Kutbay, Palaces and large residences of the Hellenistic Age, 1998
  • A. W. Lawrence, Greek Architecture, 5th ed., 1996, chs 19–21, 23–24 only
  • C. Lehmler, Syrakus unter Agathokles und Hieron II. Die Verbindung von Kultur und Macht in einer hellenistischen Metropole, 2005
  • L. H. Martin, Hellenistic Religions, 1987
  • L. C. Nevett, House and Society in the Ancient Greek World, 1999, chs 5–6 only
  • I. Nielsen, Hellenistic palaces: tradition and renewal, 1994
  • J. J. Pollitt, Art in the Hellenistic Age, 1986
  • N. K. Rauh, Sacred bonds of commerce. Religion, economy, art and society at Hellenistic Delos, 166–87 BC, 1993
  • G. Reger, Regionalism and change in the economy of independent Delos, 314–167 BC, 1994
  • G. Shipley, The Greek World after Alexander, 2000
  • R. R. R. Smith, Hellenistic Sculpture, 1991
  • H. A. Thompson and D. B. Thompson, Hellenistic pottery and terracottas, 1987

Roman Republic (509 BC – 31 BC)

  • A. E. Astin et al. (eds), Cambridge Ancient History, 2nd ed., vol. VIII, 1989, chs 7 & 13
  • P. G. Bilde, I. and M. Nielsen (eds), Aspects of hellenism in Italy, 1993
  • J. Boardman (ed.), The Oxford history of classical art, 1993, ch. 5
  • A. Boethius, Etruscan and early Roman architecture, 1978
  • F. E. Brown, Cosa: the making of a Roman city, 1980
  • J. R. Clarke, The houses of Roman Italy 100 BC – AD 250, 1991, chs 1–3
  • T. J. Cornell, The beginnings of Rome: Italy and Rome from the Bronze Age to the Punic Wars, 1995
  • K. M. D. Dunbabin, Mosaics of the Greek and Roman world, 1999, chs 1–4 and 16–20
  • H. I. Flower (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to the Roman Republic, 2004, chs 5, 9, 13 & 14
  • R. Friggeri, The epigraphic collection of the Museo Nazionale Romano at the Baths of Diocletian, 2001, 15–67
  • E. S. Gruen, Culture and national identity in Republican Rome, 1992
  • P. Holloway, The origins of Roman historical commemoration in the visual arts, 2002
  • R. R. Holloway, The archaeology of early Rome and Latium, 1996
  • R. Ling, Roman Painting, 1991, chs 1, 3, 10 & 11
  • P. Matyszak, Chronicle of the Roman Republic, 2003
  • M. Pallottino, A history of the earliest Italy, 1991
  • J. J. Pollitt, Art in the Hellenistic age, 1986, ch. 7
  • N. Rosenstein and R. Morstein-Marx (eds), A companion to the Roman Republic, 2007,
  • chs 3–6, 10, 16, 24, 27 & 28
  • M. Torelli, Studies in the Romanization of Italy, 1995
  • T. Potter, The changing landscape of south Etruria, 1979, chs 1–5
  • J. W. Stamper, The architecture of Roman temples: Republic to Middle Empire, 2005, chs 1–6
  • E. T. Salmon, Roman colonization during the Republic, 1969
  • J. M. C. Toynbee, Roman historical portraits, 1978
  • F. W. Walbank et al., Cambridge Ancient History, 2nd ed., vol. VII part 2, 1989, chs 1–4 & 12

The Early Roman Empire (31 BC – AD 235)

  • J. P. Adam, Roman building: materials and techniques, 1994
  • S. E. Alcock and R. Osborne, Classical archaeology, 2007 [(b) sections of each chapter only]
  • J. Boardman (ed.), The Oxford history of classical art, 1993, ch. 5
  • A. Claridge, Oxford archaeological guides: Rome, 1998
  • J. R. Clarke, The houses of Roman Italy 100 BC – AD 250, 1991, chs 4–8
  • J. Coulston and H. Dodge (eds), Ancient Rome: the archaeology of the Eternal City, 2000
  • K. M. D. Dunbabin, Mosaics of the Greek and Roman world, 1999
  • J. W. Hayes, Handbook of Mediterranean Roman pottery, 1997
  • A. T. Hodge, Roman aqueducts and water supply, 1992
  • L. J. F. Keppie, Understanding Roman inscriptions, 1991
  • D. E. E. Kleiner, Roman sculpture, 1993
  • R. Ling, Roman painting, 1991
  • D. S. Potter (ed.), A Companion to the Roman Empire, 2006, chs 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20
  • T. Potter, Roman Italy, 1987
  • J. W. Stamper, The architecture of Roman temples: Republic to Middle Empire, 2005, chs 7–12
  • D. Strong and D. Brown (eds), Roman crafts, 1976
  • M. Todd (ed.), A companion to Roman Britain, 2004
  • R. Turcan, The cults of the Roman Empire, 1996
  • J. M. C. Toynbee, Death and burial in the Roman World, 1971
  • J. Wacher (ed.), The Roman world, 2 vols, 1987
  • J. B. Ward-Perkins, Roman imperial architecture, 1981
  • K. E. Welch, The Roman amphitheatre: from its origins to the Colosseum, 2007
  • P. Zanker, The power of images in the age of Augustus, 1988
  • P. Zanker, Pompeii: public and private life, 1998

Later Roman Empire (c. AD 200– 476)

  • S. Bassett, The urban image of late antique Constantinople, 2004
  • J. Beckwith, Early Christian and Byzantine art, 2nd ed 1974, chs 1–4
  • J. Boardman (ed.), The Oxford history of classical art, 1993, ch. 6
  • G. Bowersock, P. Brown and O. Grabar (eds), Late antiquity: a guide to the post-classical world, 1999
  • P. Brown, The world of late antiquity, 1978
  • T. S. Burns and J. W. Eadie (eds), Urban centers and rural contexts in late antiquity, 2001
  • W. Dorigo, Late Roman painting, 1970
  • J. Elsner, Art and the Roman viewer: the transformation of art from the pagan world to Christianity, 1995
  • S. Esmonde Cleary, The ending of Roman Britain, 1989
  • N. Hannestad, Tradition in late antique sculpture, 1994
  • D. Harden (ed.), Glass of the Caesars, 1987, 101–286
  • S. Johnson, Late Roman fortifications, 1983
  • B. Kiilerich, Late fourth-century classicism in the plastic arts, 1993
  • R. Krautheimer, Early Christian and Byzantine architecture, 1975, chs 1–7
  • R. E. Leader-Newby, Silver and society in late antiquity, 2004
  • J. Percival, The Roman villa, 1976, chs 6–9
  • R. Reece, The later Roman Empire: an archaeology AD 150–600, 1999
  • P. Reynolds, Trade in the western Mediterranean AD 400–700: the ceramic evidence, 1995
  • J. Rich (ed.), The city in late antiquity, 1992
  • S. Scott, Art and society in fourth-century Britain: villa mosaics in context, 2000
  • P. Southern and K. R. Dixon, The late Roman army, 1996
  • J. B. Ward-Perkins, Roman Imperial architecture, 1981, chs 14 & 15
  • L. Webster and M. Brown (eds), The transformation of the Roman world AD 400–900, 1997
  • K. Weitzmann (ed.), Age of spirituality: late antique art and early Christian art, third to seventh century, 1979
  • E. Wightman, Roman Trier and the Treveri, 1970

The Myth and Literature of Greece, Rome, and the Near East (GRNE)

This program is designed to investigate the myth and literature of the Greek, Roman, and Near Eastern world of antiquity. Students interested in Myth and Literature who may not have the required courses at the present time are invited to consult the undergraduate advisor.

Advisor:
Lyn Rae
604 822-4066

Major in The Myth and Literature of Greece, Rome and the Near East

Students take 42 credits, which normally include the following.

First and Second Years

Students take 9-12 credits of lower-level CLST, RELG and/or NEST courses which must include CLST 105 (3), and RELG 201 (3) and RELG 203 (3).

Third and Fourth Years

Students take 30-33 credits of third- and fourth-year courses.

A. Prescribed Courses: 18 credits chosen as follows:

  1. 3 credits from CLST 333 (3) or CLST 334 (3)
  2. 6 credits from CLST 313 (3), CLST 314 (3), CLST 317 (3) or CLST 318 (3)
  3. 3 credits from RELG 302 (3), RELG 304 (3) or RELG 305 (3)
  4. CNRS 370 (3)
  5. at least 3 credits of a fourth-year seminar, either CLST 402 (3) or CLST 404 (3)

B. Optional Courses: the remaining 12-15 credits may be chosen from any upper-level literature or myth courses in NEST or CLST, or from RELG 302 (3), 304 (3), 305 (3), 311 (3), 314 (6), 315 (6), 385 (3), 403 (3), 407 (3), 414 (3), 415 (3), or from CNRS 316 (6), or from HEBR 405 (6) or any GREK or LATN course numbered 301 or above.

*Please note that CLST 301 may not be counted for credits in this major program.

Honours in The Myth and Literature of Greece, Rome and the Near East

Students take 60 credits which normally include the courses listed below. Admission into the honours program requires an overall average of 76%, an average of at least 80% in program-related courses already taken, and the permission of the department. Students are expected to maintain an 80% average in the program.

First and Second Years

Students take 12 credits of lower-level CLST and RELG courses which must include CLST 105 (3), and RELG 201 (3) and RELG 203 (3).

Third and Fourth Years

Students take 48 credits of third- and fourth-year courses.

A. Prescribed Courses: 24 credits chosen as follows:

  1. 3 credits from CLST 333 (3) or CLST 334 (3)
  2. 6 credits from CLST 313 (3) or CLST 314 (3) or CLST 317 (3) or CLST 318 (3)
  3. 3 credits from RELG 302 (3) or RELG 304 (3) or RELG 305 (3)
  4. 3 credits from CNRS 370 (3)
  5. at least 3 credits from CLST 402 (3) or CLST 404 (3)
  6. 6 credits from either CLST 449 (6) or RELG 499 (6)

B. Optional Courses: the remaining 24 credits may be chosen from any upper-level literature or myth courses in NEST or CLST, or from RELG 302 (3), 304 (3), 305 (3), 311 (3), 314 (6), 315 (6), 385 (3), 403 (3), 407 (3), 414 (3), 415 (3), or from CNRS 316 (6), or from HEBR 405 (6) or any GREK or LATN course numbered 301 or above.

*Please note that CLST 301 may not be counted for credits in this major program.

Minor in The Myth and Literature of Greece, Rome and the Near East

Students take 30 credits, which normally include the following.

First and Second Years

Students take 9-12 credits of lower-level CLST and RELG courses which must include CLST 105 (3), and RELG 201 (3) and RELG 203 (3).

Third and Fourth Years

Students take 18-21 credits of third- and fourth-year courses, chosen as follows:

A. Prescribed Course: CNRS 370 (3).

B. Optional Courses: the remaining 15-18 credits may be chosen from any upper-level literature or myth courses in NEST or CLST, or from RELG 302 (3), 304 (3), 305 (3), 311 (3), 314 (6), 315 (6), 385 (3), 403 (3), 407 (3), 414 (3), 415 (3), or CNRS 316 (6).

Please note that CLST 301 may not be counted for credits in this minor program.

The Archaeology and History of Greece, Rome and the Near East (ARGR, or CLAH pre-2009)

This program is designed to investigate the history and archaeology of the Greek, Roman, and Near Eastern world of antiquity. Students interested in Archaeology and History who may not have the required courses at the present time are invited to consult the undergraduate advisor.

Advisor:
Lyn Rae
604 822-4066

Major in The Archaeology and History of Greece, Rome and the Near East

Students take 42 credits, which normally include the following.

First and Second Years

Students take 6–12 credits chosen from CLST 110 (3), CLST 111 (3), CLST 204 (3), CLST 231 (3), CLST 232 (3), NEST 101 (3).

Third and Fourth Years

Students take 30-36 credits of third- and fourth-year courses.

A. Prescribed Courses: 21 credits chosen as follows:

  1. CLST 330 (6)
  2. 6 credits of upper-level history courses, chosen from CLST 306 (3), 307 (3), 308 (3), 311 (3), 312 (3), 319 (3), 352 (3), 353 (3), 355 (3), 356 (3
  3. NEST 302 (6)
  4. at least 3 credits of a fourth-year seminar, chosen from CLST 401 (3), CLST 403 (3), CLST 404 (3)

B. Optional Courses: the remaining 9-15 credits may be chosen from any upper-level art and archaeology or history CLST course, or from RELG 306 (3), 314 (6), 315 (6), 340 (3), 341 (3), 407 (3), or from NEST 301 (3), 303 (3), 304 (3) or from CNRS 335 (3/6). HEBR 405 (6) or any GREK or LATN courses numbered 301 or above may be used for any or all of these 9-15 credits.

Please note that CLST 301 may not be counted for credits in this major program.

Honours in Archaeology and History of Greece, Rome and the Near East

Students take 60 credits which normally include the courses listed below. Admission into the honours program requires an overall average of 76%, an average of at least 80% in program-related courses already taken, and the permission of the department. Students are expected to maintain at least an 80% average in the program.

First and Second Years

Students take 12 credits chosen from CLST 110 (3), CLST 111 (3), CLST 204 (3), CLST 231 (3), CLST 232 (3), NEST 101 (3).

Third and Fourth Years

Students take 48 credits of third- and fourth-year courses.

A. Prescribed Courses: 27 credits chosen as follows

  1. CLST 330 (6)
  2. 6 credits of upper-level history courses, chosen from CLST 306 (3), 307 (3), 308 (3), 311 (3), 312 (3), 319 (3), 352 (3), 353 (3), 355 (3), 356 (3)
  3. NEST 302 (6)
  4. at least 3 credits of a fourth-year seminar, chosen from CLST 401 (3), CLST 402 (3), CLST 403 (3), CLST 404 (3)
  5. either CLST 449 (6), or RELG 499 (6)

B. Optional Courses: the remaining 21 credits may be chosen from any of the upper-level art and archaeology or history CLST courses, or from RELG 306 (3), 314 (6), 315 (6), 340 (3), 341 (3), 407 (3), or from NEST 301 (3), 303 (3), 304 (3) or CNRS 335 (3/6). HEBR 405 (6) or any GREK or LATN course numbered 301 or above may be used for any or all of these 21 credits.

Please note that CLST 301 may not be counted for credits in this honours program.

Minor in Archaeology and History of Greece, Rome and the Near East

Students take 30 credits, which normally include the following.

First and Second Years

Students take 6–12 credits chosen from CLST 110 (3), CLST 111 (3), CLST 204 (3), CLST 231 (3), CLST 232 (3), NEST 101 (3).

Third and Fourth Years

Students take 18-24 credits, chosen as follows:

A. Prescribed Courses: 6 credits from either NEST 302 (6) or CLST 330 (6).

B. Optional Courses: the remaining 12-18 credits may be chosen from any of the upper-level art and archaeology or history CLST courses, or from upper-level NEST courses, or from RELG 306 (3), 314 (6), 315.

Please note that CLST 301 may not be counted for credits in this minor program.

Religious Studies (RELG)

Religious Studies courses are designed to investigate and compare the religions of the world throughout history.  Students interested in Religious Studies who may not have the required courses at the present time are invited to consult the undergraduate advisor.

Advisor:
Lyn Rae
604 822-4066

Major in Religious Studies

Students take 42 credits, which normally include:

First and Second Years 

Students take 6 credits of Religious Studies 100, 201, 203, 204, 205.

Third and Fourth Years

Students must take 36 credits to be selected from the following: RELG courses numbered 300 or above; NEST COURSES numbered 300 or above; CNRS courses numbered 300 or above; GREK 325.

Subject to the approval of the department, 12 of these 36 credits may come from these courses:  ANTH 329, 415; ARBC 300, ARBC 400; ARTH 352, 353, 354, 355, 364, 365; ASIA 308, 379, 382, 383;CLST 333, 334; ENGL 354, 417; GREK 100, GREK 200; HEBR 305, HEBR 405; HIST 372; ITST 310; LATN 100, LATN 200; MUSC 329, 350; PHIL 349.

Students who intend to do graduate work are advised (but not required) to choose an area of concentration in the third and fourth years, and to acquire some proficiency in the appropriate canonical language(s). For languages other than Arabic, Hebrew, Greek, or Latin, see the listings of the appropriate departments.

  1. Christianity (post-Biblical) — CNRS 316, RELG 205, 315, 320, 321, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 420, 449, 480, 485; ENGL 354; PHIL 385.
  2. Hebrew Bible and the Ancient Near East — RELG 201, 203, 304, 305, 306, 403; HEBR 305, 405, 479; NEST 301, 302, 303, 304.
  3. Islamic Studies — RELG 201, 203, 340, 341, 420, 448, 449, 480, 485; ARBC 300, 400, 420; NEST 310
  4. Judaic Studies – RELG 201, 203, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 331, 332, 335, 336, 385, 407, 408, 409, 420, 480, 485; HEBR 305, 405, 479.
  5. Near Eastern Languages and Literature — RELG 201, 203, ARBC 300, 400, 420; HEBR 305, 405, 479 and appropriate language courses from above on Hebrew Bible, Islamic Studies and Judaic Studies.
  6. New Testament — RELG 201, 203, 304, 305, 314, 414, 415, 485; GREK 325; CNRS 316.

Honours in Religious Studies

Students take 60 credits which normally include the courses listed below. Admission into the Honours Program requires an overall average of 76%, an average of at least 80% in program-related courses already taken and the permission of the Department. Students are required to maintain an 80% average in the program.

Students require a minimum of 6 credits from RELG 100, 201, 203, 204 or 205 to be considered for the Honours program in Religious Studies.

Third and Fourth Years

A program will be devised for each student, consisting of 54 credits and including a graduation essay (RELG 499). Subject to the approval of the Department, a maximum of 18 credits may be chosen from the list of courses outside the Department (see list in “Major in Religious Studies” above). NEST 310 and courses in Arabic and Hebrew, as well as up to 12 credits of 100- and 200-level Greek and Latin, may also be included.

Areas of Concentration for Majors and Honours

Students who intend to do graduate work are advised (but not required) to choose an area of concentration in the third and fourth years, and to acquire some proficiency in the appropriate canonical language(s). For languages other than Arabic, Hebrew, Greek, or Latin, see the listings of the appropriate departments.

  • Asian Religions: RELG 204, 354, 364, 365, 366, 367, 368; ASIA 308, 341, 348, 352, 358, 371, 372, 378, 379, 382, 387, 388, 398, 488
  • Christianity (post-Biblical): CNRS 316; RELG 205, 315, 320, 321, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 385, 420, 449, 480, 485; ENGL 354; PHIL 385
  • Hebrew Bible and the Ancient Near East: RELG 201, 203, 300, 304, 305, 306, 403; CLST 339; HEBR 305, 405, 479; NEST 301, 302, 303, 304
  • Islamic Studies: RELG 201, 203, 340, 341, 420, 448, 449, 480, 485; ARBC 300, 400, 420; NEST 310
  • Judaic Studies: RELG 201, 203, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 331, 332, 335, 336, 385, 407, 408, 409, 420, 480, 485; HEBR 305, 405, 479
  • Near Eastern Languages and Literature: RELG 201, 203, ARBC 300, 400, 420; HEBR 305, 405, 479 and appropriate language courses from above on Hebrew Bible, Islamic Studies, and Judaic Studies.
  • New Testament: RELG 201, 203, 304, 305, 314, 414, 415, 485; GREK 325; CNRS 316

Minor in Religious Studies

Students take 30 credits, which normally include:

First and Second Years 

Students take 6-12 credits of Religious Studies 100, 201, 203, 204, 205.

Third and Fourth Years 

Students take 18-24 credits, chosen from Religious Studies courses numbered 300 or above, or  from NEST courses numbered 300 or above, or CNRS courses numbered 300 or above, or from upper-level courses in Arabic, Hebrew, Greek and Latin.

Subject to the approval of the Department, a maximum of six credits from outside the Department may be accepted for credit toward a Minor in Religious Studies. The courses acceptable for such credit are listed above (see “Major” above).

Near Eastern Studies (NEST)

Near Eastern Studies courses are designed to investigate the history and the material culture of the ancient Near East and ancient Egypt from Prehistoric times to the end of the Pharaonic Period. Students interested in Near Eastern Studies who may not have the required courses at the present time are invited to consult the undergraduate advisor.

Advisor:
Lyn Rae
604 822-4066

 

Major in Near Eastern Studies

Students take 42 credits, which normally include the following:

First and Second Years (6 credits)

Students take Religious Studies 201 (3) and 203 (3).

Third and Fourth Years (36 credits)

Students take 36 credits of third- and fourth-year courses, as follows:

A. Prescribed Courses. 18 credits chosen from the following courses:

  1. NEST 301 (3), 302 (6), 303 (3), 304 (3), 310 (3), 311 (3), 312 (3), 313 (3)
  2. RELG 304 (3), 305 (3), 306 (3), 314 (3), 340 (6), 341 (3/6), 385 (3), 475 (3/6)*

B. Optional Courses. The remaining 18 credits may be chosen either from the list of Prescribed Courses (above) or from these courses:

  1. CNRS 316 (6)
  2. CLST 356 (3)
  3. RELG 302 (3), 309 (3), 310 (3), 311 (3), 331 (3), 332 (3), 335 (3), 403 (3), 407 (3), 408 (3), 414 (3), 448 (3), 485 (3)
  4. GREK 325 (6)
  5. HEBR 305 (6), 405 (6), 479 (3-12)
  6. ARBC 300 (6), 400 (6), 420 (3-12)

*When appropriate, and with the approval of the department.

Honours in Near Eastern Studies

Students take 60 credits which normally include the courses listed below. Admission into the Honours Program requires an overall average of 76%, and average of at least 80% in program-related courses already taken, and the permission of the Department. Students are expected to maintain an 80% average in the Program.

First and Second Years

Students take Religious Studies 201 (3) and 203 (3).

Third and Fourth Years

Students take 54 credits of third- and fourth-year courses, chosen as follows:

A. Prescribed Courses. 30 credits chosen from the following courses:

  1. NEST 301 (3), 302 (6), 303 (3), 304 (3), 310 (3), 311 (3), 312 (3), 313 (3)
  2. NEST 499 (6)
  3. RELG 304 (3), 305 (3), 306 (3), 314 (3), 340 (6), 341 (3/6), 385 (3), 475 (3/6)*

B. Optional Courses*. The remaining 24 credits may be chosen either from the list of Prescribed Courses (above) or from these courses:

  1. CLST 356 (3)
  2. RELG 302 (3), 309 (3), 310 (3), 311 (3), 331 (3), 332 (3), 335 (3), 403 (3), 407 (3), 408 (3), 414 (3), 448 (3), 485 (3)
  3. GREK 325 (6)**
  4. HEBR 305 (6), 405 (6), 479 (3-12)**
  5. ARBC 300 (6), 400 (6), 420 (3-12)**
  6. CNRS 316 (6)

* When appropriate, and with the approval of the department.

** Honours students are encouraged to take courses in Hebrew, Arabic, or New Testament Greek

Minor in Near Eastern Studies

Students take 30 credits which normally include the following.

First and Second Years

Students take Religious Studies 201 (3) and 203 (3).

Third and Fourth Years

Students take 24 credits of third- and fourth-year courses, as follows:

A. Prescribed Courses. 12 credits chosen from the following courses:

  1. NEST 301 (3), 302 (6), 303 (3), 304 (3), 310 (3), 311 (3), 312 (3), 313 (3)
  2. RELG 304 (3), 305 (3), 306 (3), 314 (3), 340 (6), 341 (3/6), 385 (3), 475 (3/6)*

B. Optional Courses. The remaining 12 credits may be chosen either from the list of Prescribed Courses (above) or from these courses:

  1. CLST 356 (3)
  2. CNRS 316 (6)
  3. RELG 302 (3), 309 (3), 310 (3), 311 (3), 331 (3), 332 (3), 335 (3), 403 (3), 407 (3), 408 (3), 414 (3), 448 (3), 485 (3)
  4. GREK 325 (6)
  5. HEBR 305 (6), 405 (6), 479 (3-12)
  6. ARBC 300 (6), 400 (6), 420 (3-6)

*When appropriate, and with the approval of the department.

Classics (CLAS)

The program in Classics is designed to investigate the life, literature, and thought of the Greek and Roman world of antiquity with an emphasis on mastery of the classical languages. Students interested in Classics who may not have the required courses at the present time are invited to consult the undergraduate advisor.

Advisor:
Lyn Rae
604 822-4066

Major in Classics

Students take 42 credits, which normally include the following.

First and Second Years

Students take 12 credits of Greek or 12 credits of Latin.

Third and Fourth Years

Students take 30 credits of Greek and/or Latin, chosen as follows:

A. Prescribed Courses: 18 credits of Greek and/or Latin numbered 301 and above, at least 3 credits of which must come from a fourth-year GREK or LATN course.

B. Optional Courses: the remaining 12 credits may be chosen from the following:

  1. GREK and/or LATN 301 and above
  2. CLST courses numbered 300 and above (with the exception of CLST 301, which may not be used for credit in the Classics major).
  3. PHIL 310 and 311

Honours in Classics

Students take 60 credits which normally include the courses listed below. Admission into the honours program requires an overall average of 76%, an average of at least 80% in program-related courses already taken, and the permission of the department. Students are expected to maintain an 80% average in the program.

First and Second Years

Students take 24 credits of lower-level Greek and of Latin (students will have to take Latin 100, Latin 200, Greek 100 and Greek 200 in their first and second years in order to qualify for Latin 301 and Greek 301, which are required in their third year. 12 credits in one of these languages will count as the 12 credits lower-level component of the program’s requirements).

Third and Fourth Years

Students take 48 credits of Greek and Latin, chosen as follows:

A. Prescribed Courses (30):

  1. GREK 301 (6) and LATN 301 (6)
  2. 18 credits of GREK and/or LATN numbered 325 and above

B. Optional Courses: the remaining 18 credits may be chosen from the following:

  1. GREK and/or LATN at the 400 level
  2. CLST courses numbered 300 and above (with the exception of CLST 301, which may not be used for credit in the Classics Honours program).
  3. PHIL 310 and 311
  4. ARBC 300 and 400
  5. HEBR 305 and 405

Minor in Greek

Students take 30 credits, which normally include the following.

First and Second Years

Students take 12 credits of lower-level Greek.

Third and Fourth Years

Students take 18 credits, chosen as follows:

  1. 6 credits of upper-level GREK
  2. 12 credits chosen from GREK or LATN courses numbered 301 and above, or from CLST courses numbered 300 and above (except Classical Studies 301, which may not be used for credit in the Greek minor), or from PHIL 310 and 311.

Minor in Latin

First and Second Years

Students take 12 credits of lower-level Latin.

Third and Fourth Years

Students take 18 credits, chosen as follows:

  1. 6 credits of upper-level LATN
  2. 12 credits chosen from GREK or LATN courses numbered 301 and above, or from CLST courses numbered 300 and above (except Classical Studies 301, which may not be used for credit in the Latin minor), or from PHIL 310 and 311.

Classical Studies (CLST)

Classical Studies courses are designed to investigate the history and culture of the ancient Greek and Roman world. Knowledge of Greek or Latin is not required for these courses.

Advisor:
Lyn Rae
604 822-4066

Major in Classical Studies

Students take 42 credits, which normally include the following:

First and Second Years

Students take 6-12 credits of first- and second-year Classical Studies courses.

Third and Fourth Years

Students take 30-36 credits of third- and fourth-year Classical Studies or related courses.

A. Prescribed Courses: 21 credits chosen as follows:

  1. 6 credits from CLST 330 (6)
  2. 6 credits of third-year literature courses, chosen from CLST 313 (3), 314 (3), 317 (3), 318 (3)
  3. 6 credits of third-year history courses, chosen from CLST 306 (3), 307 (3), 308 (3), 311 (3), 312 (3), 319 (3), 352 (3), 353 (3), 355 (3), 356 (3)
  4. at least 3 credits of a fourth-year seminar, chosen from CLST 401 (3), CLST 402 (3), CLST 403 (3), CLST 404 (3)

B. Optional Courses: the remaining 9-15 credits may be chosen from any upper-level CLST courses (with the exception of CLST 301, which may not be used for credit in the CLST major). CLST 333 (3) and 334 (3) are highly recommended. CNRS 316 (6), CNRS 335 (3/6), CNRS 370 (3), PHIL 310 (3), PHIL 311 (3) may be substituted for any or all of these optional credits. GREK or LATN courses numbered 301 or above may also be substituted for any or all of these optional credits.

Honours in Classical Studies

Students take 60 credits which normally include the courses listed below. Admission into the honours program requires an overall average of 76%, an average of at least 80% in program-related courses already taken, and the permission of the department. Students are expected to maintain an 80% average in the program.

First and Second Years

Students take 12 credits of first- and second-year Classical Studies courses.

Third and Fourth Years

Students take 48 credits, chosen as follows

A. Prescribed Courses: 27 credits chosen as follows:

  1. 6 credits from CLST 330 (6)
  2. 6 credits of third-year literature courses, chosen from CLST 313 (3), 314 (3), 317 (3), 318 (3)
  3. 6 credits of third-year history courses, chosen from CLST 306 (3), 307 (3), 308 (3), 311 (3), 312 (3), 319 (3), 352 (3), 353 (3), 355 (3), 356 (3)
  4. at least 3 credits of a fourth-year seminar, chosen from CLST 401 (3), CLST 402 (3), CLST 403 (3), CLST 404 (3)
  5. CLST 449 (6)

B. Optional Courses: 21 credits chosen as follows:

  1. Any CLST course numbered 300 and above (with the exception of CLST 301, which may not be used for credit in Honours Classical Studies). CLST 333 (3), 334 (3) are highly recommended.
  2. NEST 301 (3), 302 (6), 303 (3) and 304 (3)
  3. CNRS 316 (6), CNRS 335 (3/6), and CNRS 370 (3)
  4. PHIL 310 (3) and 311 (3)
  5. GREK or LATN courses numbered 301 or above may be substituted for up to 15 of these optional 21 credits.

Minor in Classical Studies

Students take 30 credits which normally include the following.

First and Second Years

Students take 6-12 credits of first- and second-year Classical Studies courses.

Third and Fourth Years

Students take 18-24 credits chosen from Classical Studies courses numbered 300 and above (with the exception of CLST 301, which may not be used for credit in the Classical Studies minor). CNRS 316 (6), CNRS 335 (3/6), CNRS 370 (3), PHIL 310 (3) and 311 (3) may be substituted for up to 6 of these credits.

CLST 231 (002): Ancient Greece

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