HEBR509

HEBR509

Is the Biblical Garden of Eden synonymous with Paradise? Does Genesis 2-3 represent Eve as a temptress? When does the plural noun Elohim refer to the singular God and to plural gods?How to translate the Hebrew term Adam? What does Exodus 3 recount about the secret name of God YHVH? What can the etymology of Hebrew names contribute to our understanding of specific Biblical narratives? Can the Nephilim be seen as fallen angels? Who are the Lady Wisdom and Lady Folly of the Biblical book of Proverbs? Join us as we read together select biblical narratives, discuss conceivable meaning/s of fascinating Biblical accounts, explore possible ideological-cultural aspects embedded in the texts, and examine their reception, impact and multiple interpretations over the ages.
The course will treat both linguistic and literary aspects. Students interested in examining these issues with a focus on their literary aspects can take this course as RELG 475D [no language prerequisite]. Students interested in examining these issues with a predominant focus on Biblical Hebrew should take it as HEBR 479 or HEBR 509 [prerequisite: 1st and 2nd Y Biblical Hebrew]. The course will have different sets of evaluations according to students’ focus.
Prerequisites: Two years of biblical Hebrew or proficiency.

HEBR479

Is the Biblical Garden of Eden synonymous with Paradise? Does Genesis 2-3 represent Eve as a temptress? When does the plural noun Elohim refer to the singular God and to plural gods?How to translate the Hebrew term Adam? What does Exodus 3 recount about the secret name of God YHVH? What can the etymology of Hebrew names contribute to our understanding of specific Biblical narratives? Can the Nephilim be seen as fallen angels? Who are the Lady Wisdom and Lady Folly of the Biblical book of Proverbs? Join us as we read together select biblical narratives, discuss conceivable meaning/s of fascinating Biblical accounts, explore possible ideological-cultural aspects embedded in the texts, and examine their reception, impact and multiple interpretations over the ages.
The course will treat both linguistic and literary aspects. Students interested in examining these issues with a focus on their literary aspects can take this course as RELG 475D [no language prerequisite]. Students interested in examining these issues with a predominant focus on Biblical Hebrew should take it as HEBR 479 or HEBR 509 [prerequisite: 1st and 2nd Y Biblical Hebrew]. The course will have different sets of evaluations according to students’ focus.
Prerequisites: Two years of biblical Hebrew or proficiency.

HEBR405

We will complete the basic grammar of Biblical Hebrew and read selected passages from the Hebrew Bible.
Prerequisites: Hebrew 305

HEBR305

The emphasis in this course is on grammar and translation of Biblical Hebrew. Selections from the book of Genesis and/or Jonah will be read in class.
Note: This is not a course in Modern Israeli Hebrew. Relatively little attention is given to developing oral/aural skills.
Prerequisites: Open to first- and second-year students

GREK525

Note: GREK 525B is cross-listed as CNRS 502A
Until 60 years ago, the history of Greek comedy was defined by Aristophanes, whose eleven surviving plays are the clearest insight into what the Athenians found funny. Only in the 1950s was a single complete play of Menander discovered. The other playwrights survive only in fragments: Cratinus, Crates, Eupolis, Pherecrates, Plato (the funny one), Alexis, Diphilus, Apollodorus – these names are practically unknown today, but they define the development of comedy from the fifth to the third centuries BCE. The scholarly resources to study early comedy are better now than ever before. We will use fragments (surviving on papyrus and in quotations in other authors), inscriptions, vase painting, mosaics, and all other resources available in order to reconstruct the history of Greek comedy beyond the names of Aristophanes and Menander. In doing so we”ll develop a methodology for reconstructing lost plays, we”ll see how unfunny criticism on comedy can actually be, and we”ll discover jokes about fish and the sexual implications of inappropriate lyre tuning.
This course is open to all graduate students interested in ancient theatre, literature, and history. Those who have completed Greek 301 (or its equivalent) may register in GREK 525; all others register in the (almost) Greekless option of CNRS 502,A which is also open to students in other departments.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing; and completion of Greek 301, or its equivalent.

GREK502

Note: Students may take Greek 502 more than once, since the content varies each year.
Aeschylus” Agamemnon and Libation Bearers are the first and second plays in the Oresteia, the most complete set of plays surviving to us from antiquity. The day they were performed at the City Dionysia in 458 BCE was arguably the single most important event in the cultural life of Classical Athens, providing a point of reference for all subsequent poets and philosophers. The Greek is not easy, but studying it can be rewarding. This is an advanced class in Ancient Greek, but attention will be paid to issues of stagecraft, performance, imagery, politics, and characterization in order to better understand the play in its original context.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing; completion of Greek 301 or its equivalent.

GREK501

Note: Students may take Greek 501 more than once, since the content varies each year.
This course will focus on translating selections from the historians Herodotus and Thucydides. The course will be evenly divided between these two historians, with the first six and one-half weeks devoted to Herodotus and the second six and one-half weeks devoted to Thucydides.Students will also be introduced to recent trends in modern scholarship on Herodotus and Thucydides, as well as to interpreting these historians, particularly through understanding the cultural backdrop against which they were writing and the possibilities and limitations of using them in modern historical reconstructions.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing; completion of Greek 301 or its equivalent.

GREK402

Aeschylus” Agamemnon is the first play in the Oresteia, the most complete set of plays surviving to us from antiquity. The day it was performed at the City Dionysia in 458 BCE was arguably the single most important event in the cultural life of Classical Athens, providing a point of reference for all subsequent poets and philosophers. The Greek is not easy, but studying it can be rewarding. This is an advanced class in Ancient Greek, but attention will be paid to issues of stagecraft, performance, imagery, politics, and characterization in order to better understand the play in its original context.
Note: Students may take Greek 402 more than once, since the content varies each year.
Prerequisites: Greek 301 (Students who wish to take this course concurrently with Greek 301 must obtain the permission of the instructor.)

GREK401

This course will focus on translating selections from the historians Herodotus and Thucydides.The course will be evenly divided between these two historians, with the first six and one-half weeks devoted to Herodotus and the second six and one-half weeks devoted to Thucydides.Students will also be introduced to recent trends in modern scholarship on Herodotus and Thucydides, as well as to interpreting these historians, particularly through understanding the cultural backdrop against which they were writing and the possibilities and limitations of using them in modern historical reconstructions.
Note: Students may take Greek 401 more than once, since the content varies each year.
Prerequisites: Greek 301

GREK301

This course is designed to introduce intermediate students to ancient Greek literature, prose and verse.  The selection of authors to be read varies each year, but can draw from genres as diverse as history, philosophy, biography, satire, religious texts, or even romance or early science fiction.  The works to be read will be entirely unadapted but students will have the assistance of a commentary and lexicon, as well as the support of the instructor, to assist them in making the transition to reading ancient Greek texts.  In term two, this course will concentrate on drama, in particular choosing from amongst the rich offerings of the classical tragedians Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides.  Students will learn something about the presentation of tragedy, but the focus of the course is on learning to read unadapted Greek verse with confidence.
Note:Greek 301 satisfies the literature requirement of the Faculty of Arts.
Prerequisites: Greek 200

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