NEST302

NEST302

This course is designed to provide a general introduction to the archaeology of the ancient Near East, including Prehistory, Syria-Palestine (Lebanon, Syria, Israel and Jordan), Anatolia and the civilizations of Mesopotamia. The course will emphasize the major technological, artistic and architectural achievements of each of these areas as well as focus on the material manifestations of religion, the origins of agriculture, the emergence of the world”s cities, and the rise of empires.The course will also focus on the tools and techniques of archaeological recovery that are employed in the Near East, and how these have developed over the past two centuries.
Note: Equivalent to Art History 327
Prerequisites: None

NEST301

This course provides a general introduction to the political history, culture and religion of the ancient Near East, with particular emphasis on the high civilizations of Mesopotamia (Sumer, Babylonia andAssyria). Lectures will cover major developments, from the appearance of the earliest cities in the Tigris-Euphrates flood plain up to the time of the defeat of the Persian forces by Alexander the Great. A variety of topics will be examined in order to introduce to the student the incredible richness of culture and diversity of this important part of the world. Topics include the development of the cuneiform writing system and its decipherment, Mesopotamian political ideologies, the role of royal propaganda, warfare, trade, art and architecture. The course will also discuss Sumerian and Babylonian religion and mythology, and their role in Mesopotamian society.
Text: Van de Mieroop, Marc. A History of the Ancient Near East, ca. 3000

NEST101

Most of us know about the ancient tombs, temples and pyramids of Egypt, and have heard about the great cities of Babylon, Ur and Nineveh in Mesopotamia. But how did recent archaeologists go about re-discovering these amazing cities and monuments? This course provides an overview of some of the most spectacular archaeological finds of the past two centuries in Egypt and the Near East, and the adventurers, explorers, and archaeologists who uncovered them. In the process, students will also learn about the types of archaeological techniques and tools which are used to unlock the secrets of the ancient past, and what archaeological evidence can tell us about the social, political, economic and religious aspects of life in Egypt and Mesopotamia, the ‘cradles of civilization’. There will be an opportunity for students to handle and study real archaeological artifacts from the Near East in the laboratories of the Museum of Anthropology.

Prerequisites: None.

LATN502

Seneca’s Thyestes is an archetypal revenge tragedy: Atreus hates his brother Thyestes so much that he kills Thyestes’ children and serves them up to him at a feast. The play is replete with gruesome descriptions and is not for the faint-hearted. During the course we’ll study the Latin play closely, seeing the downfall of Thyestes and analysing Atreus, possibly Seneca’s most horrifying character. We’ll set Seneca’s play in its cultural context and we’ll ask what difference it makes that Seneca was a Stoic philosopher and adviser to the emperor Nero. Among the issues we shall consider will be the political and philosophical dimensions of Seneca’s tragedy, such as the representation of power and powerlessness, and the philosophical aspects of his portrayal of anger. Then we’ll consider the play’s reception and influence on Elizabethan and Jacobean dramatists such as Kyd (The Spanish Tragedy), Shakespeare (Titus Andronicus), Jonson (Catiline, Sejanus) and Webster (The White Devil, The Duchess of Malfi). We may view Julie Taymor’s 1999 movie Titus as we grapple with the moral implications of the spectacle of barbarous violence.
Note: Students may take Latin 502 more than once, since the content varies each year.
Texts: Seneca”s Thyestes; ed. R.J. Tarrant (Georgia, 1985); and additional lines from other tragedies of Seneca
Prerequisites: Graduate standing; completion of Latin 301 or its equivalent.

LATN501

Intrigue, scandal, treachery, adultery, murder – and that”s just the first page of Book IV of Tacitus” Annales. In this course we will be reading about the exciting events of 23-28 CE as described by Tacitus in this book, including the deterioration of Tiberius” principate and the increasing influence of the “evil genius” Sejanus. We will consider Tacitus” place in Latin historiography in general and through a close reading of the Latin text discuss the historical context of this book as well as examine it as a literary work in its own right through the observation of the dramatic qualities and structure of Tacitus” narrative. Graduate students will be expected to do extra reading in Tacitus as well as presentations and a research paper on some aspects of Tacitean studies.
Text: Tacitus: Annals Book IV, edited by R. H. Martin andA. J. Woodman, University of Cambridge (1990), ISBN:9780521315432
Note: Students may take Latin 501 more than once, since the content varies each year.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing; completion of Latin 301 or its equivalent.

LATN402

Seneca’s Thyestes is an archetypal revenge tragedy: Atreus hates his brother Thyestes so much that he kills Thyestes’ children and serves them up to him at a feast. The play is replete with gruesome descriptions and is not for the faint-hearted. During the course we’ll study the Latin play closely, seeing the downfall of Thyestes and analysing Atreus, possibly Seneca’s most horrifying character. We’ll set Seneca’s play in its cultural context and we’ll ask what difference it makes that Seneca was a Stoic philosopher and adviser to the emperor Nero. Among the issues we shall consider will be the political and philosophical dimensions of Seneca’s tragedy, such as the representation of power and powerlessness, and the philosophical aspects of his portrayal of anger. Then we’ll consider the play’s reception and influence on Elizabethan and Jacobean dramatists such as Kyd (The Spanish Tragedy), Shakespeare (Titus Andronicus), Jonson (Catiline, Sejanus) and Webster (The White Devil, The Duchess of Malfi). We may view Julie Taymor’s 1999 movie Titus as we grapple with the moral implications of the spectacle of barbarous violence.
Note: Students may take Latin 402 more than once, since the content varies each year.
Texts: Seneca”s Thyestes; ed. R.J. Tarrant (Georgia, 1985)
Prerequisites: Latin 301 or its equivalent

LATN401

Intrigue, scandal, treachery, murder – and that”s just the first page of Book IV of Tacitus” Annales. In this course we will be reading about the exciting events of 23-28 CE as described by Tacitus in this book, including the deterioration of Tiberius” principate and the increasing influence of the “evil genius” Sejanus. We will consider Tacitus” place in Latin historiography in general and through a close reading of the Latin text discuss the historical context of this book as well as examine it as a literary work in its own right through the observation of the dramatic qualities and structure of Tacitus” narrative.
Note: Students may take Latin 401 more than once, since the content varies each year.
Text: Tacitus: Annals Book IV, edited by R. H. Martin andA. J. Woodman, University of Cambridge (1990), ISBN:9780521315432
Prerequisites: Latin 301 (students may take LATN 401B concurrently with LATN 301, with the permission of the instructor)

LATN301

Third-year Latin aims to enhance students’ skills in reading unadapted Latin and to introduce them to some of the great authors of classical Latin literature.  Our prose author this year (term one) will be the historian Livy.  We shall be translating a selection of famous passages from his Ab Urbe Condita, and also considering his purposes in writing, the nature of his history and the linguisitic and artistic features of his work.  Among our passages will be his narration of the founding of Rome, his stories of some early Roman heroes, his account of the Second (Hannibalic) Punic War, and his description of the Bacchic ‘conspiracy’ of 186 BCE.  In term two, we shall read selections (about 1300 lines in all) from major poets of the first centuries BCE and CE, including Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura, Catullus’ love poems, Horace’s autobiographical and lyric poetry, Ovid’s Metamorphoses, and Juvenal’s biting satires for the first half of the term and then the great tragic love story of Dido and Aeneas, Book IV of Vergil’s Aeneid.  We shall also consider the problem of translating Latin poetry and how different modern poets face the challenge.
Prerequisites: Latin 200, or equivalent

LATN200

In the first term, Latin 200 completes the fundamentals of Latin grammar and syntax that we began in Latin 100.  In the second term, we introduce selected passages of unadapted Latin from some of the major authors of Latin prose and poetry and, through the reading of these authors, we aim to help students strengthen their grasp of Latin grammar and syntax and improve their facility in translation.

LATN100

Latin was the language of the Romans and, at the height of the Roman Empire during the first three centuries of our era, was spoken throughout the whole of Western Europe and a large part of North Africa. After the fall of the Roman Empire in the west in the fifth century CE, Latin continued to be spoken in a variety of local dialects that developed through time into the modern Romance languages, e.g., French, Italian and Spanish. Latin itself survived as the common language of educated people in Europe through the church and universities until the eighteenth century. A knowledge of Latin is essential to the study of the history, literature and archaeology of the Romans and for a serious understanding of the Middle Ages in Europe and the Renaissance. It is also extremely useful in the study of the Romance languages as well as the English language, which derives much of its vocabulary from Latin. A knowledge of Latin is also rewarding in its own right; it is a language of great strength and dignity, with a literature that includes the writings of Cicero, Vergil, Ovid and other authors of enormous influence in the shaping of later European literature and thought.
Latin 100 introduces the basics of Latin grammar, which it illustrates by a series of readings adapted from the major authors of classical Latin literature.Students will be reading passages from such famous authors and works as Julius Caesar’s description of the druids, Vergil’s story of the Trojan Horse, Ovid’s tale of Cupid and Psyche, and the first-hand account by Pliny the Younger of the eruption of Mount Vesuvius.
Prerequisites: None

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