CLST: Classical Studies

Winter 2017

CLST105 Greek and Roman Mythology Sections

Greek and Roman mythology and its interpretation. Emphasis on ancient texts read in English translation.

Classical Studies 105 offers a broad introduction to the vibrant world of Greek and Roman mythology and its influence today. Because myth touched every aspect of ancient life, this course will also shed light on the literature, art, and lived experience of the Greeks and Romans. The goals of the course are to familiarize students with the myths, with the primary texts in which they are told, with the place of myth-telling in ancient culture, and to introduce students to the chief interpretive theories of myth that have been developed over the past century. The course also touches on the transformation of ancient myths in modern storytelling. Emphasis will be placed on reading primary sources in English translation, and as a result students will become familiar with a variety of ancient literary genres. This course also develops valuable transferable skills in academic reading and writing. Prerequisites: None. (No prior knowledge of the...
Read More...

CLST110 Golden Age of Athens Sections

The history and culture, values, and achievements of fifth-century Athens.

Instructor(s): Williams, Arden
This course concentrates on the remarkable political and cultural achievements of fifth century Athens addressing topics such as the development of democracy and how it functioned, the meaning of citizenship, gender and sexuality, social values and daily life, and the role of drama, art, and architecture in Athenian society. We will examine how some of the basic tenets of western culture were established during this formative period of European history, while also reflecting on how the culture and society of ancient Athens differed from our own. Prerequisites: None
Read More...

CLST111 Late Republican and Early Imperial Rome Sections

The history and culture, values, and achievements of Late Republican and Early Imperial Rome.

Instructor(s): Williams, Arden
CLST 111 Introduction to the history, culture, society of ancient Rome, with a focus on the period between 63 BCE and 14 CE, covering the collapse of the Roman Republic, the dictatorship of Julius Caesar, and the reign of Augustus. Special attention will be paid to literature and art.
Read More...

CLST204 Gods, Graves, and Goods: The Archaeology of Ancient Greece and Rome Sections

A survey of the material cultures of the pre-classical and classical civilizations of Greece and Rome, illustrating the principles and techniques used to illuminate the archaeological history of these civilizations.

Instructor(s): McCarty, Matthew
This course will provide an introduction to Greek and Roman archaeology, from roughly 1000 BCE to CE 600. The course will place particular emphasis on the different types of evidence for our knowledge about the material culture of Greek and Roman antiquity. Two-thirds of the course will deal with such topics as the history of classical archaeology, how sites get buried and how they are discovered, and we will also consider how both sites and artefacts are dated. Topics covered in this section will include aerial photography, field survey, geophysical prospection, environmental archaeology, the role of science in archaeology, and underwater archaeology, and we will also consider the importance of pottery, coins and inscriptions for the study of classical archaeology. The last third of the course will deal first with an introduction first to Greek archaeology, and then to Roman. The approach within each will be topical rather than chronological:...
Read More...

CLST211 Greek Philosophy I Sections

The Pre-Socratics; Socrates; Sophists; Plato. Recommended as preparation for CLST/PHIL 212 and PHIL 310.

Instructor(s): Griffin, Michael
The Presocratics; Socrates; Sophists. CLST 211 “The unexamined life is not worth living”: this is how the seminal Athenian philosopher Socrates explained his way of life to the jury that sentenced him. How did this attitude – and with it the complex of Western philosophy, medicine and science – first emerge in ancient Greece? In this course, we will piece together fragmentary evidence for the birth of rational speculation between the poets Homer and Hesiod (8th century BC) and Plato and Aristotle (4th century BC). Along the way, we will encounter the original articulations of Greece’s most enduring and provocative ideas. Textbook: John Cooper, Pursuits of Wisdom (Princeton, 2012). Cross-Listed as PHIL 211A Prerequisites: None
Read More...

CLST212 Greek Philosophy II Sections

Aristotle; selections from Hellenistic and Late Antique Philosophy. Recommended as preparation for PHIL 310 and PHIL 311.

Instructor(s): Berryman, Sylvia
Plato; Aristotle; selections from Hellenistic Philosophy. Is it possible to be sure that we are living a good human life, come what may? What would it be like to “succeed at” being a human being, at being ourselves? In the period under consideration in this course (c. 399 BCE–c. 529 CE), the nascent traditions of Greek logic, science, and ethics were turned to the exploration of such fundamental questions as these and spread across the Mediterranean world in the wake of Alexander the Great and the Roman Empire, laying the groundwork for the subsequent development of Western intellectual history. Over this term, we will study Aristotle, the great Hellenistic schools of ancient Athens (Stoics, Epicureans, and Skeptics) and the later ancient synthesis of Greek philosophy under the banner of Plato (Neoplatonism), and their influence on subsequent thought. Focus: Aristotle, Stoics, Epicureans, Skeptics, and Neoplatonists (4th century BCE-3rd century CE). Prerequisites: None: Students...
Read More...

CLST231 Ancient Greece Sections

A survey of the ancient Greek world from the Minoan and Mycenaean (about 2000-1000 BCE) to the Hellenistic Period (323-30 BCE).

Instructor(s): De Angelis, Franco
Why are Greeks still today, just like their ancient ancestors, known for their shipping companies and business interests? Why were ancient Greeks apparently always warring among themselves and with others? Was democracy the most common form of government in ancient Greek communities? If not, why not, and what was the most common form of government? Is the “Greek Miracle” the best lens today through which to understand the development of the ancient Greeks?  The answers to these and other topical questions of our times can be found in studying ancient Greek history. Come and explore them with me. Prerequisites: None


Read More...

CLST232 Ancient Rome Sections

A survey of the ancient Roman world from the foundation of the city to the death of Constantine.

Instructor(s): Bablitz, Leanne
"There can surely be nobody so petty or so apathetic in his outlook that he has no desire to discover by what means and under what system of government the Romans succeeded in less than fifty-three years in bringing under their rule almost the whole of the inhabited world, an achievement which is without parallel in human history." - Polybius, Universal History 1.1.5 A survey of the ancient Roman world. The course consists of a series of lectures on the world of Rome from the foundation of the city to the death of Constantine. Lectures treat the Roman monarchy, the foundation of the Roman republic and its expansion, the social, economic and political problems that led to its fall, the reorganization of government under Augustus, and the Roman empire under the emperors. Brief consideration of the reforms of Diocletian and the unsolved problem of the decline of the Roman...
Read More...

CLST260 Gladiators, Games, and Spectacle in the Greek and Roman World Sections

History, development, and social function of various forms of spectacle in ancient Greece and Rome, from the Olympic games to the Roman arena.

Instructor(s): Gorrie, Charmaine
Fame and shame. Blood and guts. Glory and death. Ancient games and spectacles promised all these and more to the people of ancient Greece and Rome. Spectacles united societies and divided them too. Ancient fans fanatically supported their favourites, but rivalries sometimes led to riots. Ranging from the competitions at the Olympic games in Greece to the spectacles of the Roman Coliseum and the Circus Maximus, this course will examine how spectacles and games functioned in the ancient world, their costs and rewards, and the costs to the humans and animals caught up in them. Over the course of the semester we will investigate the how and why of ancient games, the mechanics of how they were staged and organized, and who fought and competed in them. Prerequisites: None  
Read More...

CLST301 The Technical Terms of Medicine and Biological Science Sections

Acquaints the student with the Greek and Latin elements from which most specialized terms of modern medicine are constructed. Intended primarily for students planning to enter the medical, pharmaceutical, or biological sciences.

Instructor(s): Reid, Shelley
Classical Studies 301 helps students understand the Greek and Latin elements which are used in medical and biological terminology: students learn how to deconstruct medical and biological terminology into ordinary English so that they can easily understand and remember the language of biology and medicine. Students also learn the principles behind the construction of the terminology. The course is designed primarily for science students, particularly those in the biological or pre-medical fields, but students from other areas of study are also very welcome. No knowledge of the Greek or Latin languages is required, and no knowledge of anatomy or physiology is required.  The course additionally provides relevant material from ancient literary, mythological, historical, and medical sources, in order to furnish a cultural context for the elements under discussion. The course is offered both on-campus and on-line in both the fall and winter terms, and both cover the same vocabulary. For the on-campus...
Read More...

CLST306 Applied Science and Technology in Classical Antiquity Sections

The origins and achievements of applied technology in the Greek and Roman world from the Bronze Age to late Antiquity, with special attention to archaeological evidence.

Instructor(s): McCarty, Matthew

CLST307 Greek Law Sections

The study of Greek legal theory, practice, and institutions from their origin in self-help, through the early lawgivers and their codes, to the developed system of Athens in the fifth and fourth centuries. A variety of test cases from the works of the Greek orators will be explored.

Instructor(s): MARSHALL, CHRISTOPHER WARREN

CLST312 Women in the Roman World of Republican and Imperial Times Sections

Women in the Roman world in the culture of the Republic and the Empire. Literary, artistic, and mythological sources are compared and contrasted to historical, legal, and archaeological records.

Instructor(s): Gorrie, Charmaine
CLST 312 Matron, Mother, Mistress, Merchant, Murderer. Women played a variety of roles in ancient Roman society and in this course we will examine the evidence that we have for women’s lives as well as how they were perceived by their male contemporaries and what value to society they were believed to have. Through a critical analysis of the material and visual culture and inscriptional, legal, and literary sources we will explore the realities and ambiguities of Roman women’s lives from imperial wives to household slaves and also consider the roots of modern conceptions and perceptions of women in the Western world today. Prerequisites: Second-year standing or above.
Read More...

CLST313 Greek Epic Sections

Homer's <i>Iliad</i> and <i>Odyssey</i>, in translation.

Instructor(s): Johnson, Carl

CLST317 Classical Tragedy Sections

The plays of the Greek and Roman tragic dramatists, in translation.

Instructor(s): Yoon, Florence
This course will guide students through the earliest plays of the European tradition, reading a range of Greek and Roman tragedies in translation. Selected plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Seneca will be studied in their intellectual, historical, and performance contexts. We will consider how classical tragedy has shaped the whole tradition of Western drama, while paying particular attention to what makes classical tragedy unique, including the chorus, the integration of speech and song, and the innovative use of mythological tradition. We will also study borderline cases between tragedy and comedy, including examples of satyr drama, prosatyric tragedy, and “tragicomedy”, to explore how we define tragedy and the tragic.  
Read More...

CLST331 Greek Art and Architecture Sections

An introduction to the visual culture of the ancient Greek world in the second and first millennia BCE, especially from c. 1000 to 30 BCE.

Instructor(s): Kennell, Nigel
This course explores the art and architecture of the Greek world from about 7000 to 30 BCE.  We’ll begin with the first farmers of the Neolithic and the trace the rise of Mycenae, Knossos and other legendary palaces of the Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations.  We then examine the emergence of the Greek city states, focusing on the great Panhellenic sanctuaries of Olympia and Delphi and, of course, Athens and the famous monuments of its Akropolis and Agora that embody the rise of the world’s first democracy.  We’ll end with the spread of Greek art and architecture eastward with the conquests of Alexander the Great and the powerful Hellenistic kingdoms of his successors.  In each case we’ll consider the social, political, economic and ideological context of Greek material culture, its relationship to identities and the impacts of interactions with other cultures.  We'll also consider the legacy and reception of Greek art...
Read More...

CLST332 Roman Art and Architecture Sections

An introduction to the visual culture of the ancient Roman world from the 8th century BCE to the 4th century CE.

Instructor(s): McCarty, Matthew
CLST 332: Roman Art & Architecture The social, cultural, political, and visual history of Roman art from the eighth century BCE to the fourth century CE.  Topics include the power of images to shape society; identity construction; cultural exchanges and borrowings across the ancient world; the impact of the Roman Empire on local visual traditions; and the complex relationships between subject and representation.
Read More...

CLST333 Greek Religion Sections

A survey of both traditional and exoteric religious practices from the Archaic to the Hellenistic period. Some knowledge of ancient Greece is recommended.

Instructor(s): Cousland, Robert

CLST353 The Early Roman Empire Sections

Roman imperial history during the Julio-Claudian and Flavian periods (30 BC-96 AD).

Instructor(s): Bablitz, Leanne
The course focuses upon the Roman empire during the first century AD following its consolidation by the founding emperors Augustus and Tiberius. The performance of certain of their successors is discussed. But the emphasis is upon social, administrative and economic themes. There is investigation of how the provinces and cities of the empire were taxed and governed, and of how certain significant services were provided such as transport and supply of food staples. The nature and values of society are probed through exploration of such varied topics as the status and role of slaves and ex-slaves; the work undertaken by men and women; entertainment; and Roman funeral and burial practices. The fascinating world of Rome is likely to emerge as both less familiar, and more impenetrable and mysterious, than might have been anticipated. Sensitive exploitation of original source material, both literary and non-literary (all in translation), is an important element throughout....
Read More...

CLST355 The Athenians and their Empire Sections

The sources (literary, epigraphical and other) for Athens' emergence as one of the two leading city-states in late archaic and classical Greece and the stages by which her empire grew.

Instructor(s): Johnson, Carl
Classical Studies 355 (CLST 355 [3]): The Athenians and their Empire The sources (literary, epigraphical and other) for Athens’ emergence as one of the two leading city-states in late archaic and classical Greece and the stages which her empire grew. Prerequisite: CLST 231.   Aims of this course: examine the history and nature of the Athenian Empire gain familiarity with ancient sources of the period and some contemporary scholarship ancient and modern perspectives and representation: how history is imagined and created (affected by ideology and ontology) the nature, objectivity and purpose of history   consider the following: the development and nature of the empire from the 6th century BCE on competing representations of that empire in ancient and modern sources the empire and its effect on 5th century Greek culture the relationship between the empire and Athenian democracy
Read More...

CLST356 Alexander the Great and his Empire Sections

The rise of Macedon under Philip II leading to its domination of Greece and the overthrow of the Persian Empire by his son, Alexander; the subsequent spread of Greek civilization in the East.

Instructor(s): Johnson, Carl
"I suppose there was no race of men, no city at that time, no single person whom Alexander"s name did not reach." - Arrian,Anabasis 7.30.2.v A study of Alexander the Great: the historical figure, his legend, and his legacy. It begins with his rise, tracing the nature of Macedonia, its culture and previous kings, especially Philip II on whose successes Alexander"s legend was built.This course first examines Alexander"s accession, campaigns and untimely death and places Alexander in his social and historical context.The second part of the course will examine the legacy of Alexander through the history of the Hellenistic kingdoms and the persistence of Greek culture in the East.This course addresses questions of cultural interaction, assimilation, and conquest through the reading of the ancient sources in order to assess Alexander"s achievements and to understand the unique place which he occupies in visions of the classical past. Texts: 1.Romm, J. 2012. The Landmark Arrian:...
Read More...

CLST402A Seminar in Classical Literature - SEM CLASSCL LIT Sections

Selected topics in Greek or Roman literature, with an emphasis on research. Restricted to majors and honours students in CLST, CLAS, CLAH, ARGR, GRNE, CNRS.

Instructor(s): Johnson, Carl

CLST403A Seminar in Classical Art and Archaeology - SEM CLS ART&ARCH Sections

Selected topics in Greek or Roman art and archaeology, with an emphasis on research. Restricted to majors and honours students in CLST, CLAS, CLAH, ARGR, GRNE, CNRS.

Instructor(s): De Angelis, Franco
“Hellenism, Hellenization, and Ancient Cultural Exchange” Hellenism, Hellenization, and ancient cultural exchange are a powerful trio.  Since the late 18th century, Hellenism has been regarded as the cornerstone of Western civilization, as the ancient Greeks were credited with creating the earliest recognizable forms of modernity, such as rationality, democracy, progress, philosophy, and art.  For this reason, Hellenism has also been viewed as culturally contagious, necessitating the creation of the term Hellenization.  Hellenization is rarely precisely defined, but it involves the idea of non-Greek populations becoming culturally Greek, speaking Greek, organizing their societies like the Greeks, using Greek material culture, and worshipping Greek divinities.  In modern scholarship, not surprisingly, Hellenism and Hellenization have traditionally been the strongest and most frequently evoked causes of ancient cultural exchange in the Mediterranean and lands beyond. In this seminar course, we will critically investigate three main questions: 1) What is Hellenism? 2) What is Hellenization? and 3)...
Read More...